‘Cycling safety is paramount’

RAWCLIFFE Lane and Eastholme Drive are supposed to be on “recommended safe cycling routes” according to my cycle map of York published by City of York Council.

The fatal accident there on Saturday is by far not the first such incident between a cyclist (lulled into a false sense of security by such recommendation?) and a car (many of whose drivers use the route as a rat-run, as do drivers of HGV lorries on this stretch of road.

What is needed is:

a) A 20mph speed limit along all such recommended roads

b) Cycle-friendly chicanes to enforce same (where are the police traffic division when we need them?)

c) Bus gates (properly transponder activated – not just the proximity sensor as at Stonebow) to prevent all through traffic except properly authorised users) unilateral parking.

Like traffic lights and roundabouts these measures are not to improve traffic flow. They are to improve safety.

If drivers will not voluntarily slow down they must be made so to do. Or must we wait for further fatalities?

Steve Oxbrow, Lindley Road, York.

Comments (9)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:04pm Wed 9 Dec 09

paula41 says...

In Response to the councillors quote 'it causes me considerable concern and i think one of the lessons for cyclists is that they have to cycle defensively and be visible. wearing a helmet can also make the difference' considering the time of day of being 10.20am on a clear day the cyclist was very visible also with reference to wearing a helmet if councillor Joe Watt feels so strongly towards cyclists wearing them why is it not compulsory and the law like seat belts are, and would this of saved his life statistically can he prove this?.He should not of commented on this accident of not knowing or having a clear understanding of what happened. This has been disrespectful to a family who is grieving the loss of a husband,father,broth
er,uncle and grandad.(should Joe Watt have quoted this?? )

Yours sincerely
Alan Duffill
In Response to the councillors quote 'it causes me considerable concern and i think one of the lessons for cyclists is that they have to cycle defensively and be visible. wearing a helmet can also make the difference' considering the time of day of being 10.20am on a clear day the cyclist was very visible also with reference to wearing a helmet if councillor Joe Watt feels so strongly towards cyclists wearing them why is it not compulsory and the law like seat belts are, and would this of saved his life statistically can he prove this?.He should not of commented on this accident of not knowing or having a clear understanding of what happened. This has been disrespectful to a family who is grieving the loss of a husband,father,broth er,uncle and grandad.(should Joe Watt have quoted this?? ) Yours sincerely Alan Duffill paula41

12:20pm Wed 9 Dec 09

sheddie says...

I totally agree. Watts' comments and the press reporting of them were despicable.

Instead of implicitly blaming the victim for his own death, Watts could instead have commented that 'one of the lessons' might be to remind motorists to always take care and pay attention for more vulnerable road users, because their vehicles can be deadly, as in this tragic case.
I totally agree. Watts' comments and the press reporting of them were despicable. Instead of implicitly blaming the victim for his own death, Watts could instead have commented that 'one of the lessons' might be to remind motorists to always take care and pay attention for more vulnerable road users, because their vehicles can be deadly, as in this tragic case. sheddie

12:21pm Wed 9 Dec 09

chappers says...

The simple fact is the roundabout where the accident occured is BLIND for all road users exiting Eastholme drive. I'm suprised an accident hasn't happened here earlier. Driver and cyclist education is essential but also is the creation of safer junctions.
The simple fact is the roundabout where the accident occured is BLIND for all road users exiting Eastholme drive. I'm suprised an accident hasn't happened here earlier. Driver and cyclist education is essential but also is the creation of safer junctions. chappers

12:46pm Wed 9 Dec 09

Uncle Phil says...

Joe Watts is quoted as saying "I think one of the lessons for cyclists is that they have to cycle defensively and be visible. Wearing a helmet can also make the difference."

Mr Watts, how would wearing a helmet have prevented this accident? What makes you think this poor cyclist was not cycling defensively?

What about the lessons for drivers? Don't they rate a mention? - that you could easily kill someone with your car?

If you were selectively quoted or misquoted, the Press should be ashamed if its appalling biased reporting of this event. If you weren't, you should be ashamed of your ill-considered comments.
Joe Watts is quoted as saying "I think one of the lessons for cyclists is that they have to cycle defensively and be visible. Wearing a helmet can also make the difference." Mr Watts, how would wearing a helmet have prevented this accident? What makes you think this poor cyclist was not cycling defensively? What about the lessons for drivers? Don't they rate a mention? - that you could easily kill someone with your car? If you were selectively quoted or misquoted, the Press should be ashamed if its appalling biased reporting of this event. If you weren't, you should be ashamed of your ill-considered comments. Uncle Phil

2:09pm Wed 9 Dec 09

pedalling paul says...

My doppleganger has submitted a Readers Letter which criticises both the remarks of Cllr. Watt and the " flat cap instead of a helmet" phrase. We both await its hopeful publication with interest.
My doppleganger has submitted a Readers Letter which criticises both the remarks of Cllr. Watt and the " flat cap instead of a helmet" phrase. We both await its hopeful publication with interest. pedalling paul

5:51pm Wed 9 Dec 09

downfader says...

A point for drivers (and cyclists) to remember is that if the car was travelling over 12mph the helmet would have had limited effect due to the design and construction.
.
I know of two cyclists that lost their lives down here in the south whilst wearing helmets.The cars were doing no more than 30mph. Helmet manufacturers also will NEVER garantee the helmet for any kind of collision with a motorvehicle or over 12mph (for those that don't know - google "cycle helmet snell test"
.
Many cyclists have also died nationally despite wearing a helmet from body injuries to their torso. Complications such as internal bleeding, peritinitus and so on can occur.
.
This sad story simply highlights the need for all to take care at junctions (mini-roundabouts still count as a junction and should be treated just like any other roundabout) and to give cyclists space. High viz clothing and helmets dont even come into it when you consider many EU countries dont use them and have much, much lower stats involving collisions.
.
Its a cultural thing.
A point for drivers (and cyclists) to remember is that if the car was travelling over 12mph the helmet would have had limited effect due to the design and construction. . I know of two cyclists that lost their lives down here in the south whilst wearing helmets.The cars were doing no more than 30mph. Helmet manufacturers also will NEVER garantee the helmet for any kind of collision with a motorvehicle or over 12mph (for those that don't know - google "cycle helmet snell test" . Many cyclists have also died nationally despite wearing a helmet from body injuries to their torso. Complications such as internal bleeding, peritinitus and so on can occur. . This sad story simply highlights the need for all to take care at junctions (mini-roundabouts still count as a junction and should be treated just like any other roundabout) and to give cyclists space. High viz clothing and helmets dont even come into it when you consider many EU countries dont use them and have much, much lower stats involving collisions. . Its a cultural thing. downfader

9:07am Thu 10 Dec 09

ak7274 says...

Aren't HGV's precluded from Rawcliffe lane?
Aren't HGV's precluded from Rawcliffe lane? ak7274

10:28am Thu 10 Dec 09

George Appleby says...

Rawcliffe Lane and Green Lane are just not suitable for all the traffic which needs to use it to get to and from their work on the Clifton Moor retail and industrial areas four times a day. There are also over 5,000 residents in the parish with 4 schools. This means children walking in groups and others being taken by car 4 times a day. Also to shops and the library.

There are bottle necks at each end, out to Clifton and onto Clifton Moor, and when they get through these too many motorists try to make up the lost time by speeding.

To make matters even worse, there are a further 200 houses and more places of work replacing the old hangers at the Clifton Moor end. These people will have to get into and out to where they need to be.

I don't know how this can be made to work safely or how people will be able to restrain their need to travel faster. I wish I did.
Rawcliffe Lane and Green Lane are just not suitable for all the traffic which needs to use it to get to and from their work on the Clifton Moor retail and industrial areas four times a day. There are also over 5,000 residents in the parish with 4 schools. This means children walking in groups and others being taken by car 4 times a day. Also to shops and the library. There are bottle necks at each end, out to Clifton and onto Clifton Moor, and when they get through these too many motorists try to make up the lost time by speeding. To make matters even worse, there are a further 200 houses and more places of work replacing the old hangers at the Clifton Moor end. These people will have to get into and out to where they need to be. I don't know how this can be made to work safely or how people will be able to restrain their need to travel faster. I wish I did. George Appleby

12:56pm Thu 10 Dec 09

Stevie D says...

Uncle Phil:
What makes you think this poor cyclist was not cycling defensively?

Most cyclists don't ride defensively, and don't adopt the right road position. Most cyclists ride far too close to the kerb, which encourages drivers to overtake too close, and when there isn't enough room - it also makes them less visible to drivers waiting at side roads on the left where there is a restricted view.

Cyclists are advised to ride 2 to 3 feet from the kerb - and where the road is narrow and there isn't space for a car to overtake, or where they need to make themselves more visible to traffic waiting on the left, to move to the middle of the lane.

Unfortunately, too many cyclists think that riding along in the gutter is safer, but in doing so they are putting themselves in much greater danger.
Uncle Phil: [quote]What makes you think this poor cyclist was not cycling defensively?[/quote] Most cyclists [italic]don't[/italic] ride defensively, and don't adopt the right road position. Most cyclists ride far too close to the kerb, which encourages drivers to overtake too close, and when there isn't enough room - it also makes them less visible to drivers waiting at side roads on the left where there is a restricted view. Cyclists are advised to ride 2 to 3 feet from the kerb - and where the road is narrow and there isn't space for a car to overtake, or where they need to make themselves more visible to traffic waiting on the left, to move to the middle of the lane. Unfortunately, too many cyclists think that riding along in the gutter is safer, but in doing so they are putting themselves in much greater danger. Stevie D

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree