Seat of matter

Seat of matter

Seat of matter

First published in Letters by

THANK you for publishing the recent letter from S Keane on reactions to the need for a chair at M&S.

York Access Group can accept the view that chairs could obstruct movement in shopping aisles, just as A-boards are a hazard on narrow pavements, but this was at the counter for returns, refunds and price queries.

In some branches the same staff would be taking payments and banking queries as well, often with a significant queue building up.

Seating in such areas should be available, and its absence can only suggest a desire to frustrate ‘awkward’ customers so that they give up on a justifiable complaint, whereas it is more likely to deter customers with standing difficulties from future visits to shop.

David J Brown, York Access Group, Acomb House, York.

Comments (1)

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12:25pm Tue 5 Aug 14

Stevie D says...

Seating in such areas should be available, and its absence can only suggest a desire to frustrate ‘awkward’ customers so that they give up on a justifiable complaint, whereas it is more likely to deter customers with standing difficulties from future visits to shop.

Oh dear, oppressed class syndrome and paranoia strike again.

Sure, there might be some shops that deliberately make it unpleasant or difficult for people to queue up to use customer services, but I'm sure in most cases (especially somewhere like M&S, which is well known for its good customer services), it's more down to store management not realising that there is a problem, either because they don't understand how difficult some people find it to stand for long periods or because they aren't aware that there are regularly queues that long.

It's much more likely to be ****-up than conspiracy in this case.
[quote]Seating in such areas should be available, and its absence can only suggest a desire to frustrate ‘awkward’ customers so that they give up on a justifiable complaint, whereas it is more likely to deter customers with standing difficulties from future visits to shop.[/quote] Oh dear, oppressed class syndrome and paranoia strike again. Sure, there might be some shops that deliberately make it unpleasant or difficult for people to queue up to use customer services, but I'm sure in most cases (especially somewhere like M&S, which is well known for its good customer services), it's more down to store management not realising that there is a problem, either because they don't understand how difficult some people find it to stand for long periods or because they aren't aware that there are regularly queues that long. It's much more likely to be ****-up than conspiracy in this case. Stevie D
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