Minding manors

Minding manors

Minding manors

First published in Letters by

REGARDING the article which mentions that the Knavesmire Manor Hotel was a former Georgian manor house (Hotel checks out to become private home, July 26). I would be very interested to know more about how it gained the title of “manor house”.

In my own research into period buildings in the area (some of which have now been lost) the only manor house I came across was that known as Dringhouses Manor which stood where the Holiday Inn is now situated. A map of 1624 also shows a manor house on the site of the present Dringhouses Library.

Both of these dwellings predate the Knavesmire Manor Hotel, which as far as I was aware, was built as a Villa in the 1830s.

Dorothy Reed, Middlethorpe Drive, York.

Comments (2)

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12:28pm Tue 29 Jul 14

meme says...

I suspect you are correct and this just became Knavesmire manor as it sounded better than Knavesmire Villa when it was a hotel!
I suspect you are correct and this just became Knavesmire manor as it sounded better than Knavesmire Villa when it was a hotel! meme
  • Score: 1

3:56pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Firedrake says...

The term "manor" is frequently misapplied. Strictly, it refers to an estate, large or small, held in "fee simple" of the crown and occupied/administere
d by a "Lord of the Manor" who was not (usually) a "Lord" in the sense of "Peer". True manorial lordships usually go right back to the Conquest, so the idea of a "Georgian Manor House" is immediately suspect - alothough, of course, a manor house could be rebuilt in any period.

Sometimes, the lorsdship became disassociated from the house and land and the title changed hands though marriage or even sale. There has been a tendency, in such cases, for the legitimate "lord" to rename his new property after his own title, even when it is some distance from the true manor house. I believe this is why the big house on the corner of Monk Stray and Stockton Lane is known as the Manor House, even though it isn't. (Heworth Manor was right in the centre of the village and was demolished in the 1930s.) I seem to recall that when I lived in Barlby there were two houses in the village, each claiming to be the Manor. In fact neither was!
The term "manor" is frequently misapplied. Strictly, it refers to an estate, large or small, held in "fee simple" of the crown and occupied/administere d by a "Lord of the Manor" who was not (usually) a "Lord" in the sense of "Peer". True manorial lordships usually go right back to the Conquest, so the idea of a "Georgian Manor House" is immediately suspect - alothough, of course, a manor house could be rebuilt in any period. Sometimes, the lorsdship became disassociated from the house and land and the title changed hands though marriage or even sale. There has been a tendency, in such cases, for the legitimate "lord" to rename his new property after his own title, even when it is some distance from the true manor house. I believe this is why the big house on the corner of Monk Stray and Stockton Lane is known as the Manor House, even though it isn't. (Heworth Manor was right in the centre of the village and was demolished in the 1930s.) I seem to recall that when I lived in Barlby there were two houses in the village, each claiming to be the Manor. In fact neither was! Firedrake
  • Score: 0

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