The right to vote

The right to vote

The right to vote

First published in Letters by

I SEE that Nigel Farage has come second in the English European Elections, second only to the apathy party that took two-thirds of the votes.

It’s a funny world where people are fighting and dying for the right to vote, and yet here in this country we can’t even be bothered to spend a few minutes going to vote.

When asked why they don’t vote, people often say that politicians are all the same, in it for what they can get and don’t listen to the people.

City of York Council and the Lendal Bridge saga, so unpopular with the population of York, tends to illustrate this.This is what drives people away from the ballot box.

Now that Nigel Farage has been released from the proverbial genie’s bottle, how are they going to get him back in again?

I always vote, not for any particular party but to honour the people who won the right for me.

D M Deamer, Penleys Grove Street, Monkgate, York.

Comments (6)

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1:24pm Fri 30 May 14

Pinza-C55 says...

This letter could be summed up as "I am all for democracy as long as it produces a result I agree with".
This letter could be summed up as "I am all for democracy as long as it produces a result I agree with". Pinza-C55
  • Score: 4

2:00pm Fri 30 May 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

You know, since UKIP topped the York Polls we appear to be hearing rather a lot about the low turnout. But if you check out the historical turnout, nothing much has changed, just that UKIP spoilt the party for some.
The letter writer is correct with the example of Lendal Bridge restrictions and representatives not listening. This does indeed put the public off from voting.
But UKIP does offer a change in approach and at last offers real choice.
You know, since UKIP topped the York Polls we appear to be hearing rather a lot about the low turnout. But if you check out the historical turnout, nothing much has changed, just that UKIP spoilt the party for some. The letter writer is correct with the example of Lendal Bridge restrictions and representatives not listening. This does indeed put the public off from voting. But UKIP does offer a change in approach and at last offers real choice. ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: -26

7:49pm Fri 30 May 14

Buzzz Light-year says...

The idea of not voting can feel wrong because, as the letter writer says, we know of some peoples' struggles for a voice and for their right to a say but the truth is when we vote we uphold, perpetuate and strengthen the system of abuse and injustice which seeks to artificially empower certain individuals, their corporate allegiancies and their agendas at the expense of the fellowship between human beings. It pits us against each other whilst feeding the greedy and needy.

If I voted I would be validating the corrupt system. I refuse to endorse what I know to be wrong.
I will not choose "the best of a bad bunch" No way.

If only there were more free thinkers. I reiterate my "5 dried grams " and "250 micrograms" from the other day. It really couldn't do anything but help :-)
The idea of not voting can feel wrong because, as the letter writer says, we know of some peoples' struggles for a voice and for their right to a say but the truth is when we vote we uphold, perpetuate and strengthen the system of abuse and injustice which seeks to artificially empower certain individuals, their corporate allegiancies and their agendas at the expense of the fellowship between human beings. It pits us against each other whilst feeding the greedy and needy. If I voted I would be validating the corrupt system. I refuse to endorse what I know to be wrong. I will not choose "the best of a bad bunch" No way. If only there were more free thinkers. I reiterate my "5 dried grams " and "250 micrograms" from the other day. It really couldn't do anything but help :-) Buzzz Light-year
  • Score: 30

8:18pm Fri 30 May 14

Jonothon says...

The turn out was obviously a factor in UKIP's success. All the pundits agree that a low turn out combined with proportional representation works very well for pressure groups and small parties.

That is not to diminish the UKIP result, it is a phenomenon which has put dynamite under the main parties. However I suspect it is only partly due to Europe, but also has as much to do with the fact that people feel powerless and disenfranchised by the contempt in which they are held by the big parties, and they have lashed out. An understandable impulse, even though it was misdirected.

It looks like the pundits are divided on the long term outcome. Some say there is already a distinct hiss of escaping air from the over-inflated UKIP balloon, but others say they are here too stay. My guess is that they will do well in Newark (but will not win) on the back of the Euro success, but may not get a seat in the General Election partly because it is "first past the post" but also because the electors have registered their protest and will return to their usual voting patterns.
If that happens demoralisation with UKIP will set in fast.
The turn out was obviously a factor in UKIP's success. All the pundits agree that a low turn out combined with proportional representation works very well for pressure groups and small parties. That is not to diminish the UKIP result, it is a phenomenon which has put dynamite under the main parties. However I suspect it is only partly due to Europe, but also has as much to do with the fact that people feel powerless and disenfranchised by the contempt in which they are held by the big parties, and they have lashed out. An understandable impulse, even though it was misdirected. It looks like the pundits are divided on the long term outcome. Some say there is already a distinct hiss of escaping air from the over-inflated UKIP balloon, but others say they are here too stay. My guess is that they will do well in Newark (but will not win) on the back of the Euro success, but may not get a seat in the General Election partly because it is "first past the post" but also because the electors have registered their protest and will return to their usual voting patterns. If that happens demoralisation with UKIP will set in fast. Jonothon
  • Score: 41

9:53pm Fri 30 May 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

Keep dreaming Jonothon and the low turnout was quite normal and is low for all concerned. As for first past the post, it is just a case of getting more votes than the other candidates, job done.
Keep dreaming Jonothon and the low turnout was quite normal and is low for all concerned. As for first past the post, it is just a case of getting more votes than the other candidates, job done. ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: -32

7:14pm Mon 2 Jun 14

Dr Robert says...

The worst council York has had in many years, the present LABOUR council, won the right to ruin York with just 38% of the vote, apathy indeed.
The worst council York has had in many years, the present LABOUR council, won the right to ruin York with just 38% of the vote, apathy indeed. Dr Robert
  • Score: -73

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