Road to hell

York Press: Road to hell Road to hell

EVERYONE likes to walk in the sunny uplands, breathing clean air and enjoying the environment. There is just one problem – it doesn’t work that way.

With Lendal Bridge now open again, the council forgot a few basic facts we should all consider and they have rediscovered, the main one being “the road to hell is paved with good intentions”.

We have too many people driving too many vehicles on too small an island, and as members of the EU, our front door is wide open.

Last month, the British motor industry built more than two million vehicles of which nearly half a million were newly registered on to our roads and they all have to go somewhere – even over Lendal Bridge.

The council is rightly concerned for the health of our children and grandchildren, but we would have been better advised to design and construct a couple of extra bridges over the river to spread the ever increasing load of vehicles.

The biggest problem we have is that the city was designed by the Romans about 2,000 years ago and having the river cutting the city in half and it is slowly moving eastwards to Monks Cross and surrounding areas.

The huge variety of opinions in The Press letters pages will eventually subside, but any new initiatives that the councillors dream up need to be more deeply considered in future.

Len Spray, Trent Avenue, Huntington, York.

Comments (9)

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1:06pm Mon 5 May 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

Too many people, Len, is the main issue and destroying the green belt to build even more houses and therefore accommodate even more people will only add to the problem. Restricting or closing any bridge other than for Safety reasons is a silly idea and not a transport solution.
Too many people, Len, is the main issue and destroying the green belt to build even more houses and therefore accommodate even more people will only add to the problem. Restricting or closing any bridge other than for Safety reasons is a silly idea and not a transport solution. ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: -22

1:07pm Mon 5 May 14

pedalling paul says...

Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys.
Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.
Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys. Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option. pedalling paul
  • Score: 15

6:15pm Mon 5 May 14

notpedallingpaul says...

pedalling paul wrote:
Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys.
Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.
You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you.
[quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys. Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.[/p][/quote]You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you. notpedallingpaul
  • Score: -19

6:31pm Mon 5 May 14

York2000 says...

Lendal Bridge, Lendal Bridge, blah blah blah blah blah.
Lendal Bridge, Lendal Bridge, blah blah blah blah blah. York2000
  • Score: 4

9:06pm Mon 5 May 14

steve-white says...

notpedallingpaul wrote:
pedalling paul wrote:
Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys.
Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.
You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you.
Yeah as he said for SOME journeys! Quicker, healthier, cheaper!
[quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys. Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.[/p][/quote]You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you.[/p][/quote]Yeah as he said for SOME journeys! Quicker, healthier, cheaper! steve-white
  • Score: 23

9:17pm Mon 5 May 14

notpedallingpaul says...

steve-white wrote:
notpedallingpaul wrote:
pedalling paul wrote:
Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys.
Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.
You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you.
Yeah as he said for SOME journeys! Quicker, healthier, cheaper!
That's a matter of opinion and not something I subscribe too.
[quote][p][bold]steve-white[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]notpedallingpaul[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pedalling paul [/bold] wrote: Either we try to cater ad infinitum for endless growth in demand for car access, or encourage a switch to alternative choices for some journeys. Doing nothing will double congestion delays by 2030. I don't want my descendants to inherit a concrete covered city, so my money is on the alternative choices option.[/p][/quote]You mean we should all abandon our cars and ride bikes like you.[/p][/quote]Yeah as he said for SOME journeys! Quicker, healthier, cheaper![/p][/quote]That's a matter of opinion and not something I subscribe too. notpedallingpaul
  • Score: -25

2:10am Tue 6 May 14

Magicman! says...

York has a finite amount of roadspace... Finite, meaning 'restricted' or 'limited'.
The number of people who could buy and run a car in the UK is potentially infinite, therein lies the problem.

You cannot tell people they are forbidden to buy a car, and the topography of York means that we living here now and those who follow us are pretty much forbidden to build another bridge over the river for road transport where it would be a suitable location. The best location for a new bridge would be from Leeman Road (possibly from the Central site if it ever gets built, by means of a suitable crossing over/under the railway) across to Bootham; but that means not only demolishing a number of houses, but also placing a modern bridge structure next to the architecturally interesting (and possibly Listed) Scarborough railway bridge with a new junction being built on the already crowded street of Bootham. You can well imagine a huge public uproar from those who'd have their houses flattened or the value of their house diminished because of a busy new road being built next to it, in addition to complaints from those on the riverside (living and/or using the area) who would have the peace spoilt by a busy new road going across the river. And then you have the issue of the cost... it cost £11million just to put in 7 sets of traffic lights on Hopgrove roundabout, so for a civil engineering project like a new river crossing you'd be looking at minimum spend of £25million. It simply will never happen.

So you have to look at the options. If you are completely happy with the prospect in a few years of a journey from Haxby Road to Blossom Street taking an hour or more regardless of the time of day (between 7am to 6pm), and any other journey using the inner ring road or roads within the loop taking an inordinate amount of time because the traffic spends more time stopped than moving (and even when it does move, it only gets about 6 meters before stopping again for several minutes) - then by all means hop in the car for every single journey you ever make, no matter how stupid or ridiculously short the journey may be. But don't come complaining to the media because all the streets are gridlocked and you end up going nowhere slowly - because it is the fault of every single person who jumps into their car when they *know* an alternative method of transport is realistically available... by 'realistically available', I mean that it can be reached from the start and end point of the selected journey, the cost is roughly the same, and the journey time is roughly the same or better by the alternative travel option.
BUT, if you care for this city as a whole, including its residents and everybody else who uses the roads - then it is time to evaluate your journeys, and whether it is critical that they must be done in a car.

If everybody evaluated their journeys, this would lead to a significant proportion of people travelling within York realising an alternative is more suitable. That would take a huge number of cars off the streets of the city, making it much easier for those who have an absolute critical need to drive (the mobility-impaired, deliveries, tradespeople carrying heavy tools/ bulky items/ building materials) to be able to get around the city within a reasonable timescale; and in the process would gie a much better impression of this city to those visiting, likely leading to return visits and thus an increase in local trade.

There only two groups of people who would read this and still decide to make every journey in their car or van without even evaluating their journeys:- either they would have a critical need to drive a private vehicle around the city (disabled/ bulky items/ deliveries), or they would be a completely closed-minded person - an utterly selfish individual who only puts what in their warped mind they see as a 'need' to drive within the city centre before anybody and everybody else in the city, a person who does not care one jot about anybody else except themselves. Which group are you in??
(vote now with the thumbs - thumb up if you're trying to evaluate and change your journey types, thumb down if you're a completely closed-minded selfish individual who thinks their needs must come before that of every other person in the city)
York has a finite amount of roadspace... Finite, meaning 'restricted' or 'limited'. The number of people who could buy and run a car in the UK is potentially infinite, therein lies the problem. You cannot tell people they are forbidden to buy a car, and the topography of York means that we living here now and those who follow us are pretty much forbidden to build another bridge over the river for road transport where it would be a suitable location. The best location for a new bridge would be from Leeman Road (possibly from the Central site if it ever gets built, by means of a suitable crossing over/under the railway) across to Bootham; but that means not only demolishing a number of houses, but also placing a modern bridge structure next to the architecturally interesting (and possibly Listed) Scarborough railway bridge with a new junction being built on the already crowded street of Bootham. You can well imagine a huge public uproar from those who'd have their houses flattened or the value of their house diminished because of a busy new road being built next to it, in addition to complaints from those on the riverside (living and/or using the area) who would have the peace spoilt by a busy new road going across the river. And then you have the issue of the cost... it cost £11million just to put in 7 sets of traffic lights on Hopgrove roundabout, so for a civil engineering project like a new river crossing you'd be looking at minimum spend of £25million. It simply will never happen. So you have to look at the options. If you are completely happy with the prospect in a few years of a journey from Haxby Road to Blossom Street taking an hour or more regardless of the time of day (between 7am to 6pm), and any other journey using the inner ring road or roads within the loop taking an inordinate amount of time because the traffic spends more time stopped than moving (and even when it does move, it only gets about 6 meters before stopping again for several minutes) - then by all means hop in the car for every single journey you ever make, no matter how stupid or ridiculously short the journey may be. But don't come complaining to the media because all the streets are gridlocked and you end up going nowhere slowly - because it is the fault of every single person who jumps into their car when they *know* an alternative method of transport is realistically available... by 'realistically available', I mean that it can be reached from the start and end point of the selected journey, the cost is roughly the same, and the journey time is roughly the same or better by the alternative travel option. BUT, if you care for this city as a whole, including its residents and everybody else who uses the roads - then it is time to evaluate your journeys, and whether it is critical that they must be done in a car. If everybody evaluated their journeys, this would lead to a significant proportion of people travelling within York realising an alternative is more suitable. That would take a huge number of cars off the streets of the city, making it much easier for those who have an absolute critical need to drive (the mobility-impaired, deliveries, tradespeople carrying heavy tools/ bulky items/ building materials) to be able to get around the city within a reasonable timescale; and in the process would gie a much better impression of this city to those visiting, likely leading to return visits and thus an increase in local trade. There only two groups of people who would read this and still decide to make every journey in their car or van without even evaluating their journeys:- either they would have a critical need to drive a private vehicle around the city (disabled/ bulky items/ deliveries), or they would be a completely closed-minded person - an utterly selfish individual who only puts what in their warped mind they see as a 'need' to drive within the city centre before anybody and everybody else in the city, a person who does not care one jot about anybody else except themselves. Which group are you in?? (vote now with the thumbs - thumb up if you're trying to evaluate and change your journey types, thumb down if you're a completely closed-minded selfish individual who thinks their needs must come before that of every other person in the city) Magicman!
  • Score: -2

6:59am Tue 6 May 14

oi oi savaloy says...

York2000 wrote:
Lendal Bridge, Lendal Bridge, blah blah blah blah blah.
don't like it? simple solution, don't read it, these people have as much right to write letters and comments as you do..... freedom speech.... blah blah blah
[quote][p][bold]York2000[/bold] wrote: Lendal Bridge, Lendal Bridge, blah blah blah blah blah.[/p][/quote]don't like it? simple solution, don't read it, these people have as much right to write letters and comments as you do..... freedom speech.... blah blah blah oi oi savaloy
  • Score: -49

8:42pm Tue 6 May 14

old_geezer says...

"Last month, the British motor industry built more than two million vehicles of which nearly half a million were newly registered on to our roads "

So we're building 24 million vehicles per year? And what happened to the 1.5 million that weren't registered? They must cover fair amount of land!
"Last month, the British motor industry built more than two million vehicles of which nearly half a million were newly registered on to our roads " So we're building 24 million vehicles per year? And what happened to the 1.5 million that weren't registered? They must cover fair amount of land! old_geezer
  • Score: 0

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