Rescue boat charity top of agenda

Rescue boat charity top of agenda

Rescue boat charity top of agenda

First published in Letters by

OVER the past 18 months to two years, I have publicly highlighted the various dangers the River Ouse can pose to people – whether that be people jumping in while drunk, falling in or the dangers the floods can bring.

In light of knowing someone who tragically lost their life to the river and also having had first-hand experience of rescuing people and witnessing drunken acts that pose dangers to the individual and others, I set up the York Rescue Boat charity.

While never claiming to be the ultimate answer, I highlighted that York Rescue Boat’s aims were to have a responsive benefit by means of the rescue/patrol craft itself and a preventative side by means of education and awareness. The education and awareness objectives of York Rescue Boat are key in maximising its capabilities on the river.

I was deeply frustrated this wasn’t picked up a lot earlier by someone higher up in the council with some foresight and acted on.

However, thanks to Police and Crime Commissioner Julia Mulligan this issue has been placed at the top of the agenda and I’m optimistic that work is being done to prevent more tragic deaths.

David Benson, Founder/chairman York Rescue Boat, St Paul’s Mews, Holgate, York.

Comments (8)

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10:39pm Sat 29 Mar 14

akaroa says...

The York fire service have had a rescue boat for many tears, why can't that be used The fire service is greatly under occupied in its present configuration.
The York fire service have had a rescue boat for many tears, why can't that be used The fire service is greatly under occupied in its present configuration. akaroa
  • Score: 8

9:47am Mon 31 Mar 14

Yorkshine1 says...

yeah, incentivise jumping into the ouse. It's OK, a boat will pull me out.
yeah, incentivise jumping into the ouse. It's OK, a boat will pull me out. Yorkshine1
  • Score: 6

11:15am Mon 31 Mar 14

dsom73 says...

The answer to overnight river safety is simple.

Look at a map, realise there's no real reason to be around many parts of the river at night, think gate.

A gate at the bottom of Tanner's Moat and one on Wellington Row would stop anyone stumbling along that way and falling in. There's no real reason for anyone to take the path behind the Viking hotel as they can use North St, so close that at night too. That's that little stretch sorted at least.

Obviously, there's no planning for idiocy, but I'd argue that anyone who intentionally jumps into the river at night whilst half cut comes under Evolution anyway.
The answer to overnight river safety is simple. Look at a map, realise there's no real reason to be around many parts of the river at night, think gate. A gate at the bottom of Tanner's Moat and one on Wellington Row would stop anyone stumbling along that way and falling in. There's no real reason for anyone to take the path behind the Viking hotel as they can use North St, so close that at night too. That's that little stretch sorted at least. Obviously, there's no planning for idiocy, but I'd argue that anyone who intentionally jumps into the river at night whilst half cut comes under Evolution anyway. dsom73
  • Score: 1

11:41am Mon 31 Mar 14

dave benson says...

Yorkshine1 wrote:
yeah, incentivise jumping into the ouse. It's OK, a boat will pull me out.
The hundreds of people over the years that have jumped into the river risking their own life and the lives of others unfortunately it seems do not need an incentive, nor will a rescue/patrol boat be an added incentive.
Often when people do jump into the river, like the most recent incident receive the attention of all three 999 services. This you may agree is costly to the tax payer. Whilst not a primary motive, complimenting the existing services, York Rescue Boat could potentially relieve this burden and allow those valuable resources to be concentrated towards more urgent and life threatening incidents.
York Rescue Boat will work with members of the night time economy including Police, Doorstaff, Street Angels and CCTV in a combined and co-ordinated effort to reduce alcohol related incidents on or next to the river.
Part of York Rescue Boats objectives will be to educate and raise awareness of the dangers of jumping in, one way this will be done is by communicating with river and riverside users.
Whilst York Rescue Boat was initially set up as a responsive measure to people jumping in whilst in drink, it has since then broadened its scope of operation. This will include providing safety and assistance for all river and river side users, providing an auxiliary service to Search & Rescue and flood assistance and providing support for the many river agencies. This is a service that has been welcomed by people who have lost friends and family, members of all emergency services and over a thousand members of the local community who wish to show support or volunteer.
We appreciate your productive comment and would welcome you to email us at info@yorkrescueboat.
com so we can provide you with more information on how we aim to help with the important issue of river safety.
[quote][p][bold]Yorkshine1[/bold] wrote: yeah, incentivise jumping into the ouse. It's OK, a boat will pull me out.[/p][/quote]The hundreds of people over the years that have jumped into the river risking their own life and the lives of others unfortunately it seems do not need an incentive, nor will a rescue/patrol boat be an added incentive. Often when people do jump into the river, like the most recent incident receive the attention of all three 999 services. This you may agree is costly to the tax payer. Whilst not a primary motive, complimenting the existing services, York Rescue Boat could potentially relieve this burden and allow those valuable resources to be concentrated towards more urgent and life threatening incidents. York Rescue Boat will work with members of the night time economy including Police, Doorstaff, Street Angels and CCTV in a combined and co-ordinated effort to reduce alcohol related incidents on or next to the river. Part of York Rescue Boats objectives will be to educate and raise awareness of the dangers of jumping in, one way this will be done is by communicating with river and riverside users. Whilst York Rescue Boat was initially set up as a responsive measure to people jumping in whilst in drink, it has since then broadened its scope of operation. This will include providing safety and assistance for all river and river side users, providing an auxiliary service to Search & Rescue and flood assistance and providing support for the many river agencies. This is a service that has been welcomed by people who have lost friends and family, members of all emergency services and over a thousand members of the local community who wish to show support or volunteer. We appreciate your productive comment and would welcome you to email us at info@yorkrescueboat. com so we can provide you with more information on how we aim to help with the important issue of river safety. dave benson
  • Score: -4

11:45am Mon 31 Mar 14

dave benson says...

dsom73 wrote:
The answer to overnight river safety is simple.

Look at a map, realise there's no real reason to be around many parts of the river at night, think gate.

A gate at the bottom of Tanner's Moat and one on Wellington Row would stop anyone stumbling along that way and falling in. There's no real reason for anyone to take the path behind the Viking hotel as they can use North St, so close that at night too. That's that little stretch sorted at least.

Obviously, there's no planning for idiocy, but I'd argue that anyone who intentionally jumps into the river at night whilst half cut comes under Evolution anyway.
We agree, as do some other campaigners that current area's near the river, like the ones you have mentioned certainly need investigating.
[quote][p][bold]dsom73[/bold] wrote: The answer to overnight river safety is simple. Look at a map, realise there's no real reason to be around many parts of the river at night, think gate. A gate at the bottom of Tanner's Moat and one on Wellington Row would stop anyone stumbling along that way and falling in. There's no real reason for anyone to take the path behind the Viking hotel as they can use North St, so close that at night too. That's that little stretch sorted at least. Obviously, there's no planning for idiocy, but I'd argue that anyone who intentionally jumps into the river at night whilst half cut comes under Evolution anyway.[/p][/quote]We agree, as do some other campaigners that current area's near the river, like the ones you have mentioned certainly need investigating. dave benson
  • Score: -2

11:40am Tue 1 Apr 14

Pinza-C55 says...

Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs.
If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk.
Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs. If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 4

12:14pm Tue 1 Apr 14

dave benson says...

Pinza-C55 wrote:
Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs.
If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk.
That is certainly one answer. I think it would be very difficult to rescind as it's a national thing. There did seem to be a lot less issues. Perhaps the odd scuffle when all the pubs kicked out at the same time but to be honest it still happens anyway.
The answer does lie in the individual and their own responsibility of ones self on a night out. The worrying thing is that people have to be told how to behave and that it's adults we are telling this to. I think society is the problem and changing society is not an easy task. It seems this binge drinking culture is here to stay.
[quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs. If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk.[/p][/quote]That is certainly one answer. I think it would be very difficult to rescind as it's a national thing. There did seem to be a lot less issues. Perhaps the odd scuffle when all the pubs kicked out at the same time but to be honest it still happens anyway. The answer does lie in the individual and their own responsibility of ones self on a night out. The worrying thing is that people have to be told how to behave and that it's adults we are telling this to. I think society is the problem and changing society is not an easy task. It seems this binge drinking culture is here to stay. dave benson
  • Score: -3

8:41pm Tue 1 Apr 14

Pinza-C55 says...

dave benson wrote:
Pinza-C55 wrote:
Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs.
If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk.
That is certainly one answer. I think it would be very difficult to rescind as it's a national thing. There did seem to be a lot less issues. Perhaps the odd scuffle when all the pubs kicked out at the same time but to be honest it still happens anyway.
The answer does lie in the individual and their own responsibility of ones self on a night out. The worrying thing is that people have to be told how to behave and that it's adults we are telling this to. I think society is the problem and changing society is not an easy task. It seems this binge drinking culture is here to stay.
You can tell sober people how to behave but when they are drunk they forget the advice so it is ultimately pointless. The Press had one of it's little "campaigns" against people ending up in the river but it did not work as indeed it could never work.
[quote][p][bold]dave benson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: Or rescind the late night licensing laws so that people cannot stay out till 03.00 when they are a) Drunk b) Tired c) possibly under the influence of drugs. If pubs and bars closed at 23.00 as before people would be less tired and less likely to be drunk, plus there would be more people around who would also be less likely to be drunk.[/p][/quote]That is certainly one answer. I think it would be very difficult to rescind as it's a national thing. There did seem to be a lot less issues. Perhaps the odd scuffle when all the pubs kicked out at the same time but to be honest it still happens anyway. The answer does lie in the individual and their own responsibility of ones self on a night out. The worrying thing is that people have to be told how to behave and that it's adults we are telling this to. I think society is the problem and changing society is not an easy task. It seems this binge drinking culture is here to stay.[/p][/quote]You can tell sober people how to behave but when they are drunk they forget the advice so it is ultimately pointless. The Press had one of it's little "campaigns" against people ending up in the river but it did not work as indeed it could never work. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 2

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