Upper hand

Upper hand

Upper hand

First published in Letters by

THE violent revolution costing nearly 100 deaths and thousands of injuries, culminating in the removal of the government, left the country open to the Russians choosing the opportunity to protect the people of the Ukraine from further anarchy and killings – the reason President Putin stated for his occupation of the Russian-speaking Crimea.

The European countries and America have little chance of action other than showing disapproval.

The British and other financial institutions and businesses are completely tied into similar Russian institutions and sanctions would seriously affect everyone, so are hardly possible.

The US has offered the Ukraine government one billion dollars financial aid, sufficient for about one month.

Any EU resolution for whatever they are worth would be vetoed by Russia. For the time being Russia would seem to hold all the winning cards.

J Beisly, Osprey Close, York.

Comments (7)

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12:17pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Jonthan says...

J Beisly evidently thinks he/she is the only one who follows the news, and feels obliged to write in once a week with a summary of what he has learned.
Odd
J Beisly evidently thinks he/she is the only one who follows the news, and feels obliged to write in once a week with a summary of what he has learned. Odd Jonthan
  • Score: 9

12:34pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Firedrake says...

Perhaps he intends to become the York Press World Afairs Columnist by stealth!
Perhaps he intends to become the York Press World Afairs Columnist by stealth! Firedrake
  • Score: 4

12:42pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Omega Point says...

"Any EU resolution for whatever they are worth would be vetoed by Russia". You veto something that is passed by a group you are a member of. Russia is not part of the EU so does not veto it's resolutions. It can object of course.
"Any EU resolution for whatever they are worth would be vetoed by Russia". You veto something that is passed by a group you are a member of. Russia is not part of the EU so does not veto it's resolutions. It can object of course. Omega Point
  • Score: 4

2:33pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Pinza-C55 says...

It's a very sad situation but nothing to do with us. We should keep our noses out of foreign conflicts/wars and concentrate on our own problems.
It's a very sad situation but nothing to do with us. We should keep our noses out of foreign conflicts/wars and concentrate on our own problems. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 4

8:38pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Seadog says...

Nor is it an "either or" situation. I find myself instinctively sympathetic towards the Ukrainians who have ousted an unpopular leader in Kyev, but I am equally sympathetic towards the "Ethic Russian" majority in Crimea who desire reunion with the Russian Federation.

Of course, if you go back far enough, Crimea was neither Ukrainian nor Russian. I'm not sure who the natural inheritors of this disputed territory would be: Byzantine Greeks? AnatolianTurks? The Tatars of Krym? Hittites?
Nor is it an "either or" situation. I find myself instinctively sympathetic towards the Ukrainians who have ousted an unpopular leader in Kyev, but I am equally sympathetic towards the "Ethic Russian" majority in Crimea who desire reunion with the Russian Federation. Of course, if you go back far enough, Crimea was neither Ukrainian nor Russian. I'm not sure who the natural inheritors of this disputed territory would be: Byzantine Greeks? AnatolianTurks? The Tatars of Krym? Hittites? Seadog
  • Score: 4

9:35pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Pinza-C55 says...

Seadog wrote:
Nor is it an "either or" situation. I find myself instinctively sympathetic towards the Ukrainians who have ousted an unpopular leader in Kyev, but I am equally sympathetic towards the "Ethic Russian" majority in Crimea who desire reunion with the Russian Federation.

Of course, if you go back far enough, Crimea was neither Ukrainian nor Russian. I'm not sure who the natural inheritors of this disputed territory would be: Byzantine Greeks? AnatolianTurks? The Tatars of Krym? Hittites?
It doesn't matter. Let them fight it out among themselves.
[quote][p][bold]Seadog[/bold] wrote: Nor is it an "either or" situation. I find myself instinctively sympathetic towards the Ukrainians who have ousted an unpopular leader in Kyev, but I am equally sympathetic towards the "Ethic Russian" majority in Crimea who desire reunion with the Russian Federation. Of course, if you go back far enough, Crimea was neither Ukrainian nor Russian. I'm not sure who the natural inheritors of this disputed territory would be: Byzantine Greeks? AnatolianTurks? The Tatars of Krym? Hittites?[/p][/quote]It doesn't matter. Let them fight it out among themselves. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 1

10:24am Fri 7 Mar 14

Firedrake says...

To say nothing of Huns, Goths and Cumans, Seadog!
To say nothing of Huns, Goths and Cumans, Seadog! Firedrake
  • Score: 1

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