Judge dredge...

York Press: Judge dredge... Judge dredge...

WITH regards to saving cities and towns from flooding or the countryside, am I right or am I right (as Terry Wogan says) that if the countryside rivers are dredged out that practice should automatically relieve cities/towns?

So, there is no contest. There are too many experts who know little or nothing of practical solutions, who have barely stepped out of their overheated offices.

On our farm we have our own machine and clear out our eight-ft deep beck, cutting back over-grown grass to try to avert our fields from flooding, successfully too.

Pamela Frankland, Hull Road, Dunnington, York.

Comments (9)

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12:08pm Wed 5 Mar 14

NickPheas says...

I don't think you're right. At least not entirely.

If the river has to cope with three times it's normal level of water then dredging will help, certainly, but a river flowing three times as fast as normal will cause bank erosion, which will cause other problems further down the line.

If there was an easy answer then we wouldn't be having any kind of debate.
I don't think you're right. At least not entirely. If the river has to cope with three times it's normal level of water then dredging will help, certainly, but a river flowing three times as fast as normal will cause bank erosion, which will cause other problems further down the line. If there was an easy answer then we wouldn't be having any kind of debate. NickPheas
  • Score: 10

12:11pm Wed 5 Mar 14

TheTruthHurts says...

It seems to me that there are far too many experts on flooding around here.

Pamela you are not right in fact i have a question for you.

Do you ever wonder where the water that normally floods your fields goes to?
It seems to me that there are far too many experts on flooding around here. Pamela you are not right in fact i have a question for you. Do you ever wonder where the water that normally floods your fields goes to? TheTruthHurts
  • Score: -1

12:42pm Wed 5 Mar 14

The Great Buda says...

Just what we need, another self proclaimed expert....
Just what we need, another self proclaimed expert.... The Great Buda
  • Score: -1

1:20pm Wed 5 Mar 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

Back in the 40's, 50, and early 60's, my Grandfather would spend many weeks each year clearing ditches and general drainage channels. Also, cutting back hedges to prevent debris from entering the ditches etc.
The Winter of 1929/1930 was actually the wettest in the UK, although last Winter may have been the wettest in the South West of England?
The letter writer is correct in maximising dranage but where this falls down is when others do not do their bit in maximising drainage capacity, such as dredging the rivers. This then means that most work down stream will be largely wasted. There is no hockey stick with regard to rainfall data in the UK and heavy rain is nothig new. If we went a Month without rain the drought hysteria will start. (Only a couple of years' ago)
Water has to go somewhere and filling the countyside with houses and bases for giant wind turbins is not the answer to soak up excess rain..
Back in the 40's, 50, and early 60's, my Grandfather would spend many weeks each year clearing ditches and general drainage channels. Also, cutting back hedges to prevent debris from entering the ditches etc. The Winter of 1929/1930 was actually the wettest in the UK, although last Winter may have been the wettest in the South West of England? The letter writer is correct in maximising dranage but where this falls down is when others do not do their bit in maximising drainage capacity, such as dredging the rivers. This then means that most work down stream will be largely wasted. There is no hockey stick with regard to rainfall data in the UK and heavy rain is nothig new. If we went a Month without rain the drought hysteria will start. (Only a couple of years' ago) Water has to go somewhere and filling the countyside with houses and bases for giant wind turbins is not the answer to soak up excess rain.. ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: 5

1:51pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Jonthan says...

I have been trying to learn more about this, and there appears to be no easy solution. For example relying on dredging alone would that all the rivers the Somerset Levels area,and there are quite a few, would need to be 100 meters wide and 5 meters deep, with all the bends straightened out. The cost and huge loss of farmland might prove unacceptable, and there is no guarantee that it could be relied on in conditions such as those of the recent perion.

There will need to be a number of approaches. Not least the use of permeable surfaces on roads and concreted areas in cities to slow the rapid run-off of rainwater to the rivers,
I have been trying to learn more about this, and there appears to be no easy solution. For example relying on dredging alone would that all the rivers the Somerset Levels area,and there are quite a few, would need to be 100 meters wide and 5 meters deep, with all the bends straightened out. The cost and huge loss of farmland might prove unacceptable, and there is no guarantee that it could be relied on in conditions such as those of the recent perion. There will need to be a number of approaches. Not least the use of permeable surfaces on roads and concreted areas in cities to slow the rapid run-off of rainwater to the rivers, Jonthan
  • Score: 4

2:36pm Wed 5 Mar 14

gwen4me says...

Jonthan is correct, dredging helps in terms of navigating rivers, but does little for protection in times of heavy ranfall. The only way to protect the Somerset levels and similar areas, of which there are many, is to make sure that all the water in the river can get into the sea or estuary. The only reliable way to do this is to install pumping stations such as we have on the Foss that will pump the river out into the next watercourse. The bigger the river, the bigger the pumps. It is a matter, in the end, of economics, and balancing land against costs.
Jonthan is correct, dredging helps in terms of navigating rivers, but does little for protection in times of heavy ranfall. The only way to protect the Somerset levels and similar areas, of which there are many, is to make sure that all the water in the river can get into the sea or estuary. The only reliable way to do this is to install pumping stations such as we have on the Foss that will pump the river out into the next watercourse. The bigger the river, the bigger the pumps. It is a matter, in the end, of economics, and balancing land against costs. gwen4me
  • Score: 1

2:42pm Wed 5 Mar 14

roadwars says...

Insane letter! You are very wrong Pamela but unfortunately you are not alone within the farming community.
Your selfish approach to ensuring your land is cleared as quickly as possible of all standing water is the main contributory factor in flooding.
there should be fines imposed on landowner such as you, who alter the drainage of land without proper permission.
Insane letter! You are very wrong Pamela but unfortunately you are not alone within the farming community. Your selfish approach to ensuring your land is cleared as quickly as possible of all standing water is the main contributory factor in flooding. there should be fines imposed on landowner such as you, who alter the drainage of land without proper permission. roadwars
  • Score: 6

5:19pm Wed 5 Mar 14

E=MC^2 says...

She doesn't know what she doesn't know ,,,,, so cant the environment agency have a teach in for armchair experts such as Pamela?
She doesn't know what she doesn't know ,,,,, so cant the environment agency have a teach in for armchair experts such as Pamela? E=MC^2
  • Score: -3

8:54am Thu 6 Mar 14

old_geezer says...

Above comments correct, it all depends on local circumstances; counterintuitively, removing obstructions, dredging and straightening watercourses can actually increase flood risk. Or not. You need expert assessments.
Above comments correct, it all depends on local circumstances; counterintuitively, removing obstructions, dredging and straightening watercourses can actually increase flood risk. Or not. You need expert assessments. old_geezer
  • Score: 1

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