Rent action necessary

York Press: Rent action necessary Rent action necessary

YET another rant from Matthew Laverack – this time about the private rented sector (Letters, February 20).

His description of tenants who trashed “the house, stole the contents and disappeared leaving enormous unpaid bills” is a travesty of the truth. While there may be a very small minority to whom this applies, the vast majority are struggling with exorbitant rents of £177 a week.

I would remind Mr Laverack and others that they can require an “initial deposit” to cover the rare eventualities to which he refers.

James Alexander’s thoughtful contribution about the private rented market deserves proper debate – not the knee-jerk reaction referred to above.

The cost of escalating rents is forcing up the housing benefit bill. The Government has already introduced a benefit “cap”. This, however, does not address the cause, which results from excessive rents, but the effects of a totally unregulated market.

It is indeed time for a sensible and considered debate. Things cannot continue as they are.

Bob Towner, Hobgate, York.

Comments (10)

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12:49pm Wed 5 Mar 14

The Great Buda says...

Isn't this the same person who's wrote into this paper many times attempting to dictate how much money those less fortunate than him can have, and also how they can and cannot spend it?

Funny how the reaction is different once someone tries similar to him...
Isn't this the same person who's wrote into this paper many times attempting to dictate how much money those less fortunate than him can have, and also how they can and cannot spend it? Funny how the reaction is different once someone tries similar to him... The Great Buda
  • Score: 5

2:34pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Badgers Drift says...

Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems.

Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.
Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems. Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong. Badgers Drift
  • Score: -8

2:45pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Badgers Drift says...

Ex York Council Director of Housing, Bob Towner blames the escalating housing benefit bill on the residential property rental market being totally unregulated. If he wants to see the effects of introducing regulations, he need only look at affordable (social) housing policies which resulted in killing off many of the small housebuilders, causing the under-supply of housing which has forced rents up.

Two wrongs don't make a right, Bob !
Ex York Council Director of Housing, Bob Towner blames the escalating housing benefit bill on the residential property rental market being totally unregulated. If he wants to see the effects of introducing regulations, he need only look at affordable (social) housing policies which resulted in killing off many of the small housebuilders, causing the under-supply of housing which has forced rents up. Two wrongs don't make a right, Bob ! Badgers Drift
  • Score: -7

2:49pm Wed 5 Mar 14

roadwars says...

Badgers Drift wrote:
Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems.

Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.
Rent capping would reduce the attractiveness of investment by private landlords, leading to a reduction in the price of houses, meaning that more first time buyers could get their own house and would not need to rent, reducing the requirement for rental properties and further reducing the rent values.

A good thing for most normal people, a bad thing for the landlords who are rapidly becoming the elite class through their unregulated earnings from the poor.
[quote][p][bold]Badgers Drift[/bold] wrote: Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems. Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.[/p][/quote]Rent capping would reduce the attractiveness of investment by private landlords, leading to a reduction in the price of houses, meaning that more first time buyers could get their own house and would not need to rent, reducing the requirement for rental properties and further reducing the rent values. A good thing for most normal people, a bad thing for the landlords who are rapidly becoming the elite class through their unregulated earnings from the poor. roadwars
  • Score: 7

4:40pm Wed 5 Mar 14

jackhigh says...

So how many £177 per week rents is Socialist Coun 20's plenty coining in ?
So how many £177 per week rents is Socialist Coun 20's plenty coining in ? jackhigh
  • Score: -2

4:58pm Wed 5 Mar 14

E=MC^2 says...

Until those with housing need find it significantly easier to purchase a home than those who don't have a housing need then the problems will only get worse.The buy to rent sector should be closely regulated. There needs to be a capital gains tax on BTR property of say 300%, which would deter new investors and persuade some existing land lords to put properties on the market.
Until those with housing need find it significantly easier to purchase a home than those who don't have a housing need then the problems will only get worse.The buy to rent sector should be closely regulated. There needs to be a capital gains tax on BTR property of say 300%, which would deter new investors and persuade some existing land lords to put properties on the market. E=MC^2
  • Score: 4

5:23pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Ichabod76 says...

Do you think Bob Towner considers his time as York Council Director of Housing a success, or part of the problem we now face ?
Do you think Bob Towner considers his time as York Council Director of Housing a success, or part of the problem we now face ? Ichabod76
  • Score: -2

7:33pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Jonthan says...

Badgers Drift wrote:
Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems.

Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.
Welcome back to the fray Rocking Horse.
[quote][p][bold]Badgers Drift[/bold] wrote: Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems. Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.[/p][/quote]Welcome back to the fray Rocking Horse. Jonthan
  • Score: 1

9:00pm Wed 5 Mar 14

Mulgrave says...

roadwars wrote:
Badgers Drift wrote:
Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems.

Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.
Rent capping would reduce the attractiveness of investment by private landlords, leading to a reduction in the price of houses, meaning that more first time buyers could get their own house and would not need to rent, reducing the requirement for rental properties and further reducing the rent values.

A good thing for most normal people, a bad thing for the landlords who are rapidly becoming the elite class through their unregulated earnings from the poor.
But if you look at the yields, ie rent as a proportion of house price, is it certain any rent control body would stipulate they should be significantly lower than currently? There are plenty of other areas where yields are well above those in York - a York 2 bed terrace costing £150k could be rented for £625 pcm, a yield of 5%. Go somewhere in East Yorkshire with the same house type at £65k and the rent will perhaps be £425 pcm - a yield pushing 8%.
[quote][p][bold]roadwars[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Badgers Drift[/bold] wrote: Rent capping would reduce investment by private landlords, which in turn would reduce housing supply, and create even bigger problems. Bob Towwner and James Alexander are both wrong.[/p][/quote]Rent capping would reduce the attractiveness of investment by private landlords, leading to a reduction in the price of houses, meaning that more first time buyers could get their own house and would not need to rent, reducing the requirement for rental properties and further reducing the rent values. A good thing for most normal people, a bad thing for the landlords who are rapidly becoming the elite class through their unregulated earnings from the poor.[/p][/quote]But if you look at the yields, ie rent as a proportion of house price, is it certain any rent control body would stipulate they should be significantly lower than currently? There are plenty of other areas where yields are well above those in York - a York 2 bed terrace costing £150k could be rented for £625 pcm, a yield of 5%. Go somewhere in East Yorkshire with the same house type at £65k and the rent will perhaps be £425 pcm - a yield pushing 8%. Mulgrave
  • Score: -1

11:42pm Wed 5 Mar 14

AnotherPointofView says...

The Great Buda wrote:
Isn't this the same person who's wrote into this paper many times attempting to dictate how much money those less fortunate than him can have, and also how they can and cannot spend it?

Funny how the reaction is different once someone tries similar to him...
Can we have this in English please?
[quote][p][bold]The Great Buda[/bold] wrote: Isn't this the same person who's wrote into this paper many times attempting to dictate how much money those less fortunate than him can have, and also how they can and cannot spend it? Funny how the reaction is different once someone tries similar to him...[/p][/quote]Can we have this in English please? AnotherPointofView
  • Score: -3

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