Why not write a note?

York Press: Why not write a note? Why not write a note?

CONCERNING your lead article “Access denied to deaf patients” (The Press, February 10), while more detailed explanations by NHS officials may well require an interpreter for deaf persons, what is wrong with pen and paper?

Surely a mother whose son is to have an injection could read a simple explanation if it were written down? A simple solution is so rarely sought these days.

Douglas Mumford, The Mount, York.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

5:52pm Sun 16 Feb 14

Sillybillies says...

It appears that Mr Mumford has missed the whole point of the NHS. It's not to find low cost or simple solutions. It's job creation for an army of non medical staff and associated administrators.

Causing perceived shortages leads to even more recruitment as a result of public demand, a public who haven't got the plot. As for the poor long suffering patient, just a bloody nuisance interfering with staff discussions about their social lives.
It appears that Mr Mumford has missed the whole point of the NHS. It's not to find low cost or simple solutions. It's job creation for an army of non medical staff and associated administrators. Causing perceived shortages leads to even more recruitment as a result of public demand, a public who haven't got the plot. As for the poor long suffering patient, just a bloody nuisance interfering with staff discussions about their social lives. Sillybillies
  • Score: 1

12:55pm Mon 17 Feb 14

healthwatch york says...

Whilst for some this would be a solution, many Deaf people do not have written English as a language they are confident in. For many Deaf people British Sign Language is their first and preferred method of communication. So whilst it is a simple solution for some situations, which we would encourage people to try, other solutions are still needed. Where a more detailed discussion is required, a face to face interpreter remains the most suitable.
Whilst for some this would be a solution, many Deaf people do not have written English as a language they are confident in. For many Deaf people British Sign Language is their first and preferred method of communication. So whilst it is a simple solution for some situations, which we would encourage people to try, other solutions are still needed. Where a more detailed discussion is required, a face to face interpreter remains the most suitable. healthwatch york
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree