York has to boost its core industries

A craftsman at work on a jig at York Carriageworks in 1974

A craftsman at work on a jig at York Carriageworks in 1974

First published in Letters by

MANY interesting letters appear in The Press. Some complain of councils misspending; others make personal comments, which can detract from a good point.

I will never complain where councillors make efforts to budget and spend on projects for the benefit of York citizens. I do wish, however, that a reasonable balance between the requirements for tourism and housing and jobs in manufacturing and growing were at the front of minds in all debates.

York has let slip in 25 years the employment provided in its industrial sector. This had a greater mix of skills and the appropriate rewards which make a local economy more viable. Useful and varied employment has many social advantages, not just financial.

The use of brown-field sites for housing only has a negative long-term effect if no industrial capacity remains.

Land is at a premium; its use and planning is important in shaping the type of York we will see in the future. Tourism and education should only be part of this. Efforts to increase industry should have equal priority.

Phil Crowder, York Road, Haxby, York.

Comments (6)

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1:42pm Wed 22 Jan 14

dsom73 says...

Yes yes yes. Thank you.
Yes yes yes. Thank you. dsom73
  • Score: 8

2:38pm Wed 22 Jan 14

ColdAsChristmas says...

Good point: If former industrial land (Brown field) is used for housing, where are all the necessary jobs & industry's going to go? Green field perhaps?
All these new houses and no major new employer makes one think that the jobs must be out of town? If that is the case then where is all the new road capacity to get us to those jobs? Looks like the Council think we are going to get there by cycle from what I can see. (Where the investment is)
BTW, CoYC has spent £60,000 on electric car charging points. Never yet seen a car plugged into one in York, only on Top Gear as it happens, on TV !
Good point: If former industrial land (Brown field) is used for housing, where are all the necessary jobs & industry's going to go? Green field perhaps? All these new houses and no major new employer makes one think that the jobs must be out of town? If that is the case then where is all the new road capacity to get us to those jobs? Looks like the Council think we are going to get there by cycle from what I can see. (Where the investment is) BTW, CoYC has spent £60,000 on electric car charging points. Never yet seen a car plugged into one in York, only on Top Gear as it happens, on TV ! ColdAsChristmas
  • Score: -11

7:08pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Pinza-C55 says...

Although I sympathise with the writer this is sadly wishful thinking. The sole remaining "core" industry in York is Nestlé and the rest have irretrievably gone to Europe or China. If we left Europe this could be reversed but again this is unlikely. It is ironic that the photo shows the carriage works which is "not allowed" to be reopened. Furthermore it is worth remembering that York has no rail freight handling facilities. Tourism it is, and will be forever.
Although I sympathise with the writer this is sadly wishful thinking. The sole remaining "core" industry in York is Nestlé and the rest have irretrievably gone to Europe or China. If we left Europe this could be reversed but again this is unlikely. It is ironic that the photo shows the carriage works which is "not allowed" to be reopened. Furthermore it is worth remembering that York has no rail freight handling facilities. Tourism it is, and will be forever. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 6

9:48pm Wed 22 Jan 14

PKH says...

Pinza-C55 wrote:
Although I sympathise with the writer this is sadly wishful thinking. The sole remaining "core" industry in York is Nestlé and the rest have irretrievably gone to Europe or China. If we left Europe this could be reversed but again this is unlikely. It is ironic that the photo shows the carriage works which is "not allowed" to be reopened. Furthermore it is worth remembering that York has no rail freight handling facilities. Tourism it is, and will be forever.
And the council are trying to harm the tourist industry with Lendal Bridge.
[quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: Although I sympathise with the writer this is sadly wishful thinking. The sole remaining "core" industry in York is Nestlé and the rest have irretrievably gone to Europe or China. If we left Europe this could be reversed but again this is unlikely. It is ironic that the photo shows the carriage works which is "not allowed" to be reopened. Furthermore it is worth remembering that York has no rail freight handling facilities. Tourism it is, and will be forever.[/p][/quote]And the council are trying to harm the tourist industry with Lendal Bridge. PKH
  • Score: -16

1:04am Thu 23 Jan 14

Magicman! says...

Sadly, York is just a reflection of what has happened nationally... as a nation moves from 'developing' to 'developed', the modal shift of industry moves from heavy manual industries and manufacturing towards services and financial industries.... which is propelled by globalisation whereby multinational companies decide they can get bigger profits by moving their workforce to some random developing country where their workers in such lands can be paid less than £1 per hour and work 12 hours or more a day (compared to £6.60 per hour for 8 hours work a day here in the UK). The only way the trend will reverse is when the other nations become fully developed, workers form unions, and their demands for a certain pay level are met - with that pay level being equal or more than that of the UK; but the likely outcome initially would be the multinationals shift work to some other developing country, and on the cycle goes....
Certain industries do have a good UK base, with a few car manufacturing plants dotted around (including Nissan in Sunderland), the UK leads in bus building (2 companies are based in North Yorkshire), and also construction plant; but our country otherwise lacks any real proper industry base - merely coasting by on previous successes and the belief that we had a strong financial system.
Sadly, York is just a reflection of what has happened nationally... as a nation moves from 'developing' to 'developed', the modal shift of industry moves from heavy manual industries and manufacturing towards services and financial industries.... which is propelled by globalisation whereby multinational companies decide they can get bigger profits by moving their workforce to some random developing country where their workers in such lands can be paid less than £1 per hour and work 12 hours or more a day (compared to £6.60 per hour for 8 hours work a day here in the UK). The only way the trend will reverse is when the other nations become fully developed, workers form unions, and their demands for a certain pay level are met - with that pay level being equal or more than that of the UK; but the likely outcome initially would be the multinationals shift work to some other developing country, and on the cycle goes.... Certain industries do have a good UK base, with a few car manufacturing plants dotted around (including Nissan in Sunderland), the UK leads in bus building (2 companies are based in North Yorkshire), and also construction plant; but our country otherwise lacks any real proper industry base - merely coasting by on previous successes and the belief that we had a strong financial system. Magicman!
  • Score: 2

2:32pm Sat 25 Jan 14

York Fox says...

Magicman! wrote:
Sadly, York is just a reflection of what has happened nationally... as a nation moves from 'developing' to 'developed', the modal shift of industry moves from heavy manual industries and manufacturing towards services and financial industries.... which is propelled by globalisation whereby multinational companies decide they can get bigger profits by moving their workforce to some random developing country where their workers in such lands can be paid less than £1 per hour and work 12 hours or more a day (compared to £6.60 per hour for 8 hours work a day here in the UK). The only way the trend will reverse is when the other nations become fully developed, workers form unions, and their demands for a certain pay level are met - with that pay level being equal or more than that of the UK; but the likely outcome initially would be the multinationals shift work to some other developing country, and on the cycle goes....
Certain industries do have a good UK base, with a few car manufacturing plants dotted around (including Nissan in Sunderland), the UK leads in bus building (2 companies are based in North Yorkshire), and also construction plant; but our country otherwise lacks any real proper industry base - merely coasting by on previous successes and the belief that we had a strong financial system.
Magicman! That is complete sense. I salute you. Many of the changes in Britain since the second world war have been to do with globalisation of our economy. We want cheap, and cheap will come from poorer countries.

The only way this can be changed is as you say, though time as the world economy comes full cycle, or through protectionist policies which keep jobs and industry in Britain. Of course that route results in much higher prices for everything we need and want, and involves exit from the EU and other treaties. Only a very brave politician would do such a thing.
[quote][p][bold]Magicman![/bold] wrote: Sadly, York is just a reflection of what has happened nationally... as a nation moves from 'developing' to 'developed', the modal shift of industry moves from heavy manual industries and manufacturing towards services and financial industries.... which is propelled by globalisation whereby multinational companies decide they can get bigger profits by moving their workforce to some random developing country where their workers in such lands can be paid less than £1 per hour and work 12 hours or more a day (compared to £6.60 per hour for 8 hours work a day here in the UK). The only way the trend will reverse is when the other nations become fully developed, workers form unions, and their demands for a certain pay level are met - with that pay level being equal or more than that of the UK; but the likely outcome initially would be the multinationals shift work to some other developing country, and on the cycle goes.... Certain industries do have a good UK base, with a few car manufacturing plants dotted around (including Nissan in Sunderland), the UK leads in bus building (2 companies are based in North Yorkshire), and also construction plant; but our country otherwise lacks any real proper industry base - merely coasting by on previous successes and the belief that we had a strong financial system.[/p][/quote]Magicman! That is complete sense. I salute you. Many of the changes in Britain since the second world war have been to do with globalisation of our economy. We want cheap, and cheap will come from poorer countries. The only way this can be changed is as you say, though time as the world economy comes full cycle, or through protectionist policies which keep jobs and industry in Britain. Of course that route results in much higher prices for everything we need and want, and involves exit from the EU and other treaties. Only a very brave politician would do such a thing. York Fox
  • Score: 1

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