Too many homes to let

York Press: Too many homes to let Too many homes to let

WHY is it that the council (and the Government) go on about the lack of affordable homes in the city when other people know that it is because there are too many student lets?

I challenge the councillors to take a ride or walk along the streets around the Hull Road area at this time of year and see the number of to-let boards.

Most of these houses at one time were available for young people to buy at a reasonable price; now they have been converted from a normal family home to student accommodation. Also, the council is receiving no council tax from these houses.

If the University of York had not been allowed to sprawl and extend without limitations, or had been compelled to build sufficient accommodation for the population of students, then this problem would not have occurred.

But it appears that City of York Council allows the university to develop whatever and whenever.

Kathleen Pepper, Heath Croft York.

Comments (15)

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11:12am Tue 21 Jan 14

The Great Buda says...

A very good letter, that raises a very good point.

However private landlords must take some of the blame along with the University. Just look at how many houses are being rented out at a price greater than a first time buyer would pay on a Mortgage.
A very good letter, that raises a very good point. However private landlords must take some of the blame along with the University. Just look at how many houses are being rented out at a price greater than a first time buyer would pay on a Mortgage. The Great Buda

12:25pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23.
How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23. Mulgrave

1:12pm Tue 21 Jan 14

WhyEver says...

The government grant to the council includes compensation for exempt dwellings, including student lets. So the council still gets income from the house.

As for limitations on the University growth, remember the years of planning enquiries and the long list of planning conditions attached to everything the University builds.

The lack of family housing is mostly down to the NIMBY outcry every time someone proposes building any new ones.
The government grant to the council includes compensation for exempt dwellings, including student lets. So the council still gets income from the house. As for limitations on the University growth, remember the years of planning enquiries and the long list of planning conditions attached to everything the University builds. The lack of family housing is mostly down to the NIMBY outcry every time someone proposes building any new ones. WhyEver

3:30pm Tue 21 Jan 14

roclank2000 says...

Mulgrave wrote:
How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23.
Scarcasm is sometimes difficult to express online, and is often missed.
[quote][p][bold]Mulgrave[/bold] wrote: How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23.[/p][/quote]Scarcasm is sometimes difficult to express online, and is often missed. roclank2000

3:45pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Jonthan says...

I agree with much of what the writer says, but why does she "challenge the councillors ". What have the councillors got to do with rash of buy to let properties in York and other University cities?

The student lets are certainly changing the character of large swathes of York, and not always for the better, but there is no law which prevents a landlord from letting to students. Sorry to spoil the fun for the right wingers, but it is not a matter for the council.

If you want to allocate blame, remember that Mrs Thatcher's government sold off the council houses. Many former council houses are now part of the buy to rent market that the writer complains about.
I agree with much of what the writer says, but why does she "challenge the councillors ". What have the councillors got to do with rash of buy to let properties in York and other University cities? The student lets are certainly changing the character of large swathes of York, and not always for the better, but there is no law which prevents a landlord from letting to students. Sorry to spoil the fun for the right wingers, but it is not a matter for the council. If you want to allocate blame, remember that Mrs Thatcher's government sold off the council houses. Many former council houses are now part of the buy to rent market that the writer complains about. Jonthan

3:55pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

Jonthan wrote:
I agree with much of what the writer says, but why does she "challenge the councillors ". What have the councillors got to do with rash of buy to let properties in York and other University cities?

The student lets are certainly changing the character of large swathes of York, and not always for the better, but there is no law which prevents a landlord from letting to students. Sorry to spoil the fun for the right wingers, but it is not a matter for the council.

If you want to allocate blame, remember that Mrs Thatcher's government sold off the council houses. Many former council houses are now part of the buy to rent market that the writer complains about.
In fact there has been an atricle 4 declaration in force for a couple of years which removes the permitted right to let to three or more unrelated persons without seeking planning consent from the council. This will not be given for properties in the already popular student areas, but does not affect existing let's. That, and the failure to understand the Council tax position correctly makes it a poor letter.
[quote][p][bold]Jonthan[/bold] wrote: I agree with much of what the writer says, but why does she "challenge the councillors ". What have the councillors got to do with rash of buy to let properties in York and other University cities? The student lets are certainly changing the character of large swathes of York, and not always for the better, but there is no law which prevents a landlord from letting to students. Sorry to spoil the fun for the right wingers, but it is not a matter for the council. If you want to allocate blame, remember that Mrs Thatcher's government sold off the council houses. Many former council houses are now part of the buy to rent market that the writer complains about.[/p][/quote]In fact there has been an atricle 4 declaration in force for a couple of years which removes the permitted right to let to three or more unrelated persons without seeking planning consent from the council. This will not be given for properties in the already popular student areas, but does not affect existing let's. That, and the failure to understand the Council tax position correctly makes it a poor letter. Mulgrave

7:46pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Vine Weevil says...

To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term.
As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year.
To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term. As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year. Vine Weevil

7:57pm Tue 21 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

Vine Weevil wrote:
To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term.
As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year.
The threshold is three or more unrelated people - period. It is not about sub-division of the property, and applies to a single tenancy agreement as well as multiple tenancies.
[quote][p][bold]Vine Weevil[/bold] wrote: To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term. As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year.[/p][/quote]The threshold is three or more unrelated people - period. It is not about sub-division of the property, and applies to a single tenancy agreement as well as multiple tenancies. Mulgrave

10:56pm Tue 21 Jan 14

sensetalking says...

Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?
Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets? sensetalking

7:27am Wed 22 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

sensetalking wrote:
Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?
It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band.
[quote][p][bold]sensetalking[/bold] wrote: Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?[/p][/quote]It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band. Mulgrave

9:19am Wed 22 Jan 14

The Great Buda says...

roclank2000 wrote:
Mulgrave wrote:
How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23.
Scarcasm is sometimes difficult to express online, and is often missed.
But is often bang on the money.
[quote][p][bold]roclank2000[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mulgrave[/bold] wrote: How much better the housing situation would be if these parasites and free loaders stopped using houses as places to live in groupse at maximum efficiency and knuckled down and got themselves married off with a couple of kids by time they were 23.[/p][/quote]Scarcasm is sometimes difficult to express online, and is often missed.[/p][/quote]But is often bang on the money. The Great Buda

9:45am Wed 22 Jan 14

sensetalking says...

Mulgrave wrote:
sensetalking wrote:
Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?
It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band.
I was talking about Landlords' council tax not income tax. If they had a small shop or office or workshop instead they'd have to pay the business equivalent of council tax. Their property let to students is a business but ordinary taxpayers are paying their council tax.
[quote][p][bold]Mulgrave[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sensetalking[/bold] wrote: Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?[/p][/quote]It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band.[/p][/quote]I was talking about Landlords' council tax not income tax. If they had a small shop or office or workshop instead they'd have to pay the business equivalent of council tax. Their property let to students is a business but ordinary taxpayers are paying their council tax. sensetalking

11:59am Wed 22 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

sensetalking wrote:
Mulgrave wrote:
sensetalking wrote:
Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?
It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band.
I was talking about Landlords' council tax not income tax. If they had a small shop or office or workshop instead they'd have to pay the business equivalent of council tax. Their property let to students is a business but ordinary taxpayers are paying their council tax.
I understood your point, and responded to it - whilst a shopkeeper pays the business rates over to the collection authority, I think you will find that it is ultimately the customers who pay if the business is profitable. In fact it is quite topical with high street shops struggling to compete with the low overheads of online rivals.
[quote][p][bold]sensetalking[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mulgrave[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sensetalking[/bold] wrote: Landlords who rent out properties to students are running a business from which they get a very nice income. These houses are free from council tax, yes. The government gives councils a grant for this, yes. But where does the government get that money from? Taxpayers. It simply doesn't make sense that landlords don't pay. If they'd invested their money in any other business they'd have to pay so why not from buy-to-lets?[/p][/quote]It would be the student tenants who would end up paying, as an overhead added to all businesses in a market simply feeds through to the customer, rents currently reflect the status quo. Of course profit from letting is taxed just like any other income, and if on top of a salary may be in the 40% band.[/p][/quote]I was talking about Landlords' council tax not income tax. If they had a small shop or office or workshop instead they'd have to pay the business equivalent of council tax. Their property let to students is a business but ordinary taxpayers are paying their council tax.[/p][/quote]I understood your point, and responded to it - whilst a shopkeeper pays the business rates over to the collection authority, I think you will find that it is ultimately the customers who pay if the business is profitable. In fact it is quite topical with high street shops struggling to compete with the low overheads of online rivals. Mulgrave

1:44pm Wed 22 Jan 14

WhyEver says...

Vine Weevil wrote:
To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term.
As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year.
The letting conditions apply to any dwelling with multiple unrelated tennants, although it might have come too late for some streets it should prevent areas from getting significantly worse.

The planning restrictions on the University say they can only build on 20% of the land, so the campus is bound to be mostly open. With the new campus they have the open areas around the edges and the buildings close together, the old campus is more evenly spread.
[quote][p][bold]Vine Weevil[/bold] wrote: To be fair to the city council, they do now require planning permission before a house can be subdivided for multiple occupation. That of course does not prevent a house being let in its entirety to a group of students or foreign workers, or indeed let out to race goers for a few weeks of the year. Some streets in York are turning into 'Apart-Hotels' to use a trendy term. As far as the sprawling university campus is concerned I agree. The Badly Designed Ego-trips-in-a-park growth of York University is not normal. Most universities in the UK are far better designed with a more compact layout. After all, most students do have to walk everywhere and negotiating a frozen wasteland is not pleasant at this time of year.[/p][/quote]The letting conditions apply to any dwelling with multiple unrelated tennants, although it might have come too late for some streets it should prevent areas from getting significantly worse. The planning restrictions on the University say they can only build on 20% of the land, so the campus is bound to be mostly open. With the new campus they have the open areas around the edges and the buildings close together, the old campus is more evenly spread. WhyEver

11:22pm Wed 22 Jan 14

oi oi savaloy says...

its all about getting the student vote!!
don't you see??
how on earth will labour stay in power in york with out it?
levene relies on it!
alexander wants voting age down to 16...
doesn't matter that york is vastly becoming **** hole with them in charge
its all about getting the student vote!! don't you see?? how on earth will labour stay in power in york with out it? levene relies on it! alexander wants voting age down to 16... doesn't matter that york is vastly becoming **** hole with them in charge oi oi savaloy

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