Get a grip

York Press: Get a grip Get a grip

RECENTLY I helped with a questionnaire circulated to all households in Strensall.

The objective was to find out what people want in their village.

The majority said that they felt the village was big enough, that the infrastructure could not cope with more people, that the school is full to capacity and the traffic flow in the village is a very serious problem.

Now we have a new proposal for building houses on the green belt in the village.

The parish council is opposed and is saying so, but where are the residents?

Don’t just sit there and moan after it has happened. Do something.

Write to City of York Council, which seems to think it is okay to build on the green belt in an overcrowded village. Talk to your local representative, Mr Doughty, who is genuinely concerned.

Go to the City of York Council meeting and let them know how we all feel.

Come on, Strensall – get a grip and stop this development. It has not been approved yet!

D J Little, Strensall, York.

Comments (2)

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12:55pm Thu 2 Jan 14

Mulgrave says...

Nobody could say Strensall hasn't hosted its fair share of new homes over the past thirty years, however, unlike the York Road development of the 1980s which included retail and services businesses, the development at the Brecks Lane end brings nothing except more cars. I moved away a few years ago, but a good anti develpoment stance would be a survey of transport modes from that end, commuting by car is one thing, but I rarely spotted anyone walking into the village proper to the shops and school. On paper this development will be "sustainable" due to the bus route and "walkability" of local services, but the reality is very different.

If building is to take place on Green Belt it would be better to get a critical mass of housing in a development somewhere that would include local facilities rather than be parasitic to a Village who's infrastructure reached saturation point some while ago.
Nobody could say Strensall hasn't hosted its fair share of new homes over the past thirty years, however, unlike the York Road development of the 1980s which included retail and services businesses, the development at the Brecks Lane end brings nothing except more cars. I moved away a few years ago, but a good anti develpoment stance would be a survey of transport modes from that end, commuting by car is one thing, but I rarely spotted anyone walking into the village proper to the shops and school. On paper this development will be "sustainable" due to the bus route and "walkability" of local services, but the reality is very different. If building is to take place on Green Belt it would be better to get a critical mass of housing in a development somewhere that would include local facilities rather than be parasitic to a Village who's infrastructure reached saturation point some while ago. Mulgrave

1:46am Fri 3 Jan 14

Magicman! says...

^ - indeed... the problem is most developers don't see including shops and services (ie a school, surgery or dentists) to be as profitable compared to getting two or three houses on the same plot of land... heck, most developments have their roads set out in stupid squiggly patterns and/or with loads of random cul-de-sacs which go on for ages, with road widths of any through-streets either too narrow or without a substantial base to support buses going along them regularly (as per the Brecks Lane development - it's a big loop, but buses can't get round it)... the end result is a load of houses but no actual community, everybody is insular, nobody walks anywhere and so no 'hello' to passers by, just get in the car and drive the 2 minutes down to the shop.

It's worth noting the development by the ambulance station on Huntington Road is going to include a new Spar shop to replace the current shop a bit further along.
^ - indeed... the problem is most developers don't see including shops and services (ie a school, surgery or dentists) to be as profitable compared to getting two or three houses on the same plot of land... heck, most developments have their roads set out in stupid squiggly patterns and/or with loads of random cul-de-sacs which go on for ages, with road widths of any through-streets either too narrow or without a substantial base to support buses going along them regularly (as per the Brecks Lane development - it's a big loop, but buses can't get round it)... the end result is a load of houses but no actual community, everybody is insular, nobody walks anywhere and so no 'hello' to passers by, just get in the car and drive the 2 minutes down to the shop. It's worth noting the development by the ambulance station on Huntington Road is going to include a new Spar shop to replace the current shop a bit further along. Magicman!

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