Old route shows a better way for HS2

THERE is an uncanny resemblance between the proposed route of the High Speed 2 (HS2) railway and the first 1840 route between York and London via Normanton, Derby, Leicester and Rugby to Euston.

If or when HS2 is opened to Church Fenton, then via the existing line to York there is likely to be a fairly marginal reduction in journey time to London, assuming that there has been investment in the East Coast Main Line track and trains.

An improvement which could be made at relatively low cost compared to HS2 would be to extend the Selby/Selby coalfield diversion opened in 1983 from Temple Hirst to the north of Doncaster then east of Doncaster to a point near to Bawtry. This new route would avoid the bottle neck at Doncaster and provide an opportunity for a new station adjacent to Robin Hood Airport. The York to London journey time would reduce to below 100 minutes. Why is HS2 so important for the York to London railway service?

David Randon, Blue Slates Close, Wheldrake, York.

 

• GOOD news served in doses of extra jobs, etc, over 20 years until 2033 implied by the announcement of the goahead for the £33billion H2 train plan.

This is likely to be an optimistic estimate, simply because there will be many unfortunates who will have generous compensation payments when their properties are compulsory purchased to install the new line.

The 235mph rail service, excluding unexpected delays, will reduce a two-hour journey by 20 minutes. This will be to the rail terminus, some at a distance from city centres, hopefully not too much time will be wasted getting the final destination.

Futhermore, what heights will the price of tickets have reached by 2033?

John Beisly, Osprey Close, York.

Comments (7)

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1:17pm Wed 30 Jan 13

ColdAsChristmas says...

HS2 makes no sense for York.
You would speed things up by putting on more trains or extra carriages as needed.
Further, this could be done at a fraction of the cost and provide British jobs for British workers by insisting that the new rolling stock is designed and manufactured in the UK.
(Not guaranteed in the EU)
Paying a fortune in compensation and disruption in order to save 20-30 minutes off the York to London time at a ticket price possibly unaffordable to the masses makes no sense what so ever.
Then again, the idea of anti man made global warming measures makes no scientific or economical sense either but the wind turbines keep coming. Sadly, this will come along too and we will all be in it together to pay the bill, though we won't all be able to afford to ride on the HS2.
HS2 makes no sense for York. You would speed things up by putting on more trains or extra carriages as needed. Further, this could be done at a fraction of the cost and provide British jobs for British workers by insisting that the new rolling stock is designed and manufactured in the UK. (Not guaranteed in the EU) Paying a fortune in compensation and disruption in order to save 20-30 minutes off the York to London time at a ticket price possibly unaffordable to the masses makes no sense what so ever. Then again, the idea of anti man made global warming measures makes no scientific or economical sense either but the wind turbines keep coming. Sadly, this will come along too and we will all be in it together to pay the bill, though we won't all be able to afford to ride on the HS2. ColdAsChristmas

4:10pm Wed 30 Jan 13

CynicaloldGit says...

I think you will find, and looking at the proposed route, those in power believe that the north, or the viable north, stops at Leeds/Manchester.
York, Newcastle etc are simply in the wilderness as far as business is concerened........no
t my beliefs, but listening to the radio discussions on HS2, it all points that way.
I think you will find, and looking at the proposed route, those in power believe that the north, or the viable north, stops at Leeds/Manchester. York, Newcastle etc are simply in the wilderness as far as business is concerened........no t my beliefs, but listening to the radio discussions on HS2, it all points that way. CynicaloldGit

8:55pm Wed 30 Jan 13

PinzaC55 says...

David Randon said "An improvement which could be made at relatively low cost compared to HS2 ".
This misses the fact that when national and local government are concerned, "saving money" doesn't enter into the picture. Last year we had the olympics at a cost of £11.5 billion for 3 weeks of sport, now we have COYC's new palace at £44 million. They have access to an inexhaustible source of cash.....us.
David Randon said "An improvement which could be made at relatively low cost compared to HS2 ". This misses the fact that when national and local government are concerned, "saving money" doesn't enter into the picture. Last year we had the olympics at a cost of £11.5 billion for 3 weeks of sport, now we have COYC's new palace at £44 million. They have access to an inexhaustible source of cash.....us. PinzaC55

12:32am Thu 31 Jan 13

ColdAsChristmas says...

Green bin tax will never pay for it.
Green bin tax will never pay for it. ColdAsChristmas

3:30am Thu 31 Jan 13

Magicman! says...

Unfortunately, HS2 hasn't really been designed to benefit York. It has been designed to benefit Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester. Even years after the route was unveiled to go that way I still cannot fathom who the government decided to send it through Birmingham, which is served by TWO different main lines (West Coast and Chiltern) as opposed to taking a direct route up the east side to Nottingham and then a split to Yorkshire and Lancashire, with the Yorkshire side continuing to Newcastle, Edinburgh and Inverness.
Unfortunately, HS2 hasn't really been designed to benefit York. It has been designed to benefit Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester. Even years after the route was unveiled to go that way I still cannot fathom who the government decided to send it through Birmingham, which is served by TWO different main lines (West Coast and Chiltern) as opposed to taking a direct route up the east side to Nottingham and then a split to Yorkshire and Lancashire, with the Yorkshire side continuing to Newcastle, Edinburgh and Inverness. Magicman!

7:12am Thu 31 Jan 13

CynicaloldGit says...

Magicman! wrote:
Unfortunately, HS2 hasn't really been designed to benefit York. It has been designed to benefit Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester. Even years after the route was unveiled to go that way I still cannot fathom who the government decided to send it through Birmingham, which is served by TWO different main lines (West Coast and Chiltern) as opposed to taking a direct route up the east side to Nottingham and then a split to Yorkshire and Lancashire, with the Yorkshire side continuing to Newcastle, Edinburgh and Inverness.
That is what I said didn't I?
Thanks for the confirmantion, I did think that I was the only one who could see this coming.
Well said magicman at least tgwo of us aren't fooled by the hype.
[quote][p][bold]Magicman![/bold] wrote: Unfortunately, HS2 hasn't really been designed to benefit York. It has been designed to benefit Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester. Even years after the route was unveiled to go that way I still cannot fathom who the government decided to send it through Birmingham, which is served by TWO different main lines (West Coast and Chiltern) as opposed to taking a direct route up the east side to Nottingham and then a split to Yorkshire and Lancashire, with the Yorkshire side continuing to Newcastle, Edinburgh and Inverness.[/p][/quote]That is what I said didn't I? Thanks for the confirmantion, I did think that I was the only one who could see this coming. Well said magicman at least tgwo of us aren't fooled by the hype. CynicaloldGit

4:01am Sun 3 Feb 13

Magicman! says...

Indeed. And what is even more strange is that HS2 stops just where a new line is needed even more, up to Scotland... the West Coast Main Line is almost full (apart from 2 or 3 paths) between lancaster and oxenholme, and will be completely full by 2015 - the East Coast Main Line will be full by 2018.... and yet somehow HS2 trains are expected to squeeze in after they arrive into York!

The blurb for HS2 on the west side only mentions trains going as far north as Preston, so obviously they're not planning on any improvements to capacity over that side of the hills!!
Indeed. And what is even more strange is that HS2 stops just where a new line is needed even more, up to Scotland... the West Coast Main Line is almost full (apart from 2 or 3 paths) between lancaster and oxenholme, and will be completely full by 2015 - the East Coast Main Line will be full by 2018.... and yet somehow HS2 trains are expected to squeeze in after they arrive into York! The blurb for HS2 on the west side only mentions trains going as far north as Preston, so obviously they're not planning on any improvements to capacity over that side of the hills!! Magicman!

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