Words of poverty

I WARMLY welcome The Press campaign on poverty, as poverty is increasing in our area.

More people than ever are affected by rising prices, government cuts and unemployment. These are problems for the whole of society. But often, people experiencing poverty are abused by politicians and in the media with terms such as ‘skivers’, ‘scroungers’, ‘chavs’ and ‘underclass’.

In these tough economic times, your paper can continue to play an important role by using appropriate language.

Your readers include people who are experiencing poverty. They need to be participants rather than objects. Let’s celebrate the tenacity and resilience of people who manage to get by and support their families in such challenging circumstances.

This week is the Action Week on homelessness and poverty, promoted by Church Action on Poverty; and it is noteworthy that the Christian community in York is playing its part in addressing these issues through initiatives such as the Restore housing association, the weekly meal provided by the Never Give Up group, the Besom project, the food bank at Gateway in Acomb, and other longstanding responses.

I should like to think that The Press campaign would have the wholehearted support of all people of goodwill, whether with a religious faith or not.

Keith Steven, South Bank Avenue, York.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:58pm Wed 30 Jan 13

andyjon12 says...

People who are experiencing abject poverty do indeed read the press. And it's true that current language and discourse, associated with poor people is outrageous and often wrongly implies that they are living a life of Riley. A good example of this can be observed by reading the Press article (Homeless families in £60,000 B&B bill, 23 July 2012). Press reporter Mike Laycock strongly implies that the unfortunate people who had to be put up in the Holiday Inn because they had nowhere to live, were being treated to a life of luxury and had indeed fallen on their feet. Laycock couldn't resist stressing that these poor destitute families would enjoy having access to a free luxury swimming pool, Sky TV, Internet access and so on. I'm "surprised" that Laycock didn't mention the trouser press! Anyway, in my opinion this exemplifies how the Press are indeed "two faced" when it comes to tackling poverty. Whilst the Press continues to participate in such scurrilous and sensationalistic articles at vulnerable peoples expense, how on earth can their campaign on poverty really be taken seriously?
People who are experiencing abject poverty do indeed read the press. And it's true that current language and discourse, associated with poor people is outrageous and often wrongly implies that they are living a life of Riley. A good example of this can be observed by reading the Press article (Homeless families in £60,000 B&B bill, 23 July 2012). Press reporter Mike Laycock strongly implies that the unfortunate people who had to be put up in the Holiday Inn because they had nowhere to live, were being treated to a life of luxury and had indeed fallen on their feet. Laycock couldn't resist stressing that these poor destitute families would enjoy having access to a free luxury swimming pool, Sky TV, Internet access and so on. I'm "surprised" that Laycock didn't mention the trouser press! Anyway, in my opinion this exemplifies how the Press are indeed "two faced" when it comes to tackling poverty. Whilst the Press continues to participate in such scurrilous and sensationalistic articles at vulnerable peoples expense, how on earth can their campaign on poverty really be taken seriously? andyjon12

11:56am Thu 31 Jan 13

inthesticks says...

andyjon12 wrote:
People who are experiencing abject poverty do indeed read the press. And it's true that current language and discourse, associated with poor people is outrageous and often wrongly implies that they are living a life of Riley. A good example of this can be observed by reading the Press article (Homeless families in £60,000 B&B bill, 23 July 2012). Press reporter Mike Laycock strongly implies that the unfortunate people who had to be put up in the Holiday Inn because they had nowhere to live, were being treated to a life of luxury and had indeed fallen on their feet. Laycock couldn't resist stressing that these poor destitute families would enjoy having access to a free luxury swimming pool, Sky TV, Internet access and so on. I'm "surprised" that Laycock didn't mention the trouser press! Anyway, in my opinion this exemplifies how the Press are indeed "two faced" when it comes to tackling poverty. Whilst the Press continues to participate in such scurrilous and sensationalistic articles at vulnerable peoples expense, how on earth can their campaign on poverty really be taken seriously?
Well said andyjon12 and a good observation.
Losing ones home must be absolutely horrific and stressful and I don`t believe anyone would go through this deliberately to end up in a crummy hotel or B&B not knowing where you will end up. Don`t people realise that hotels are used because of the shocking lack of alternatives.
During the 80`s I knew several people who made themselves homeless to then get a council property they could buy at a discount, I also knew several people who bought the council properties that their parents were living in knowing that when the elderly parents died they had a nice chunk of profit - scams that were allowed under another financially driven Tory Government.
Just a reminder that the JRF state that over 60% of children who live in poverty are from families who`s parents are working. The huge cost of fuel and food, transport costs as well as increases in all other living expenses means that we have many families in our city and rural areas (often forgotten by our council), really struggling to get by.
What is also concerning is the amount of people who are ending their lives.
Re: the letter above. Any scheme to help is welcome but the real solutions are with government and are not going to happen under this greedy shower. Also I hope the tone of the last part of the letter isn`t suggesting that people of no religion have done nothing, smugness suggesting that only religious people do good gets on my nerves.
[quote][p][bold]andyjon12[/bold] wrote: People who are experiencing abject poverty do indeed read the press. And it's true that current language and discourse, associated with poor people is outrageous and often wrongly implies that they are living a life of Riley. A good example of this can be observed by reading the Press article (Homeless families in £60,000 B&B bill, 23 July 2012). Press reporter Mike Laycock strongly implies that the unfortunate people who had to be put up in the Holiday Inn because they had nowhere to live, were being treated to a life of luxury and had indeed fallen on their feet. Laycock couldn't resist stressing that these poor destitute families would enjoy having access to a free luxury swimming pool, Sky TV, Internet access and so on. I'm "surprised" that Laycock didn't mention the trouser press! Anyway, in my opinion this exemplifies how the Press are indeed "two faced" when it comes to tackling poverty. Whilst the Press continues to participate in such scurrilous and sensationalistic articles at vulnerable peoples expense, how on earth can their campaign on poverty really be taken seriously?[/p][/quote]Well said andyjon12 and a good observation. Losing ones home must be absolutely horrific and stressful and I don`t believe anyone would go through this deliberately to end up in a crummy hotel or B&B not knowing where you will end up. Don`t people realise that hotels are used because of the shocking lack of alternatives. During the 80`s I knew several people who made themselves homeless to then get a council property they could buy at a discount, I also knew several people who bought the council properties that their parents were living in knowing that when the elderly parents died they had a nice chunk of profit - scams that were allowed under another financially driven Tory Government. Just a reminder that the JRF state that over 60% of children who live in poverty are from families who`s parents are working. The huge cost of fuel and food, transport costs as well as increases in all other living expenses means that we have many families in our city and rural areas (often forgotten by our council), really struggling to get by. What is also concerning is the amount of people who are ending their lives. Re: the letter above. Any scheme to help is welcome but the real solutions are with government and are not going to happen under this greedy shower. Also I hope the tone of the last part of the letter isn`t suggesting that people of no religion have done nothing, smugness suggesting that only religious people do good gets on my nerves. inthesticks

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree