Right way to cycle

IN RESPONSE to D McTernan and Kevin Benson (Letters, January 18), it is legal, reasonable and acceptable for a cyclist to take up a position in the road well away from the kerb in order to deter a following driver from attempting what would be a dangerous overtake.

Not only that but precisely this manouevre is recommended in Cyclecraft, the manual for the DfT-sponsored cycle-training scheme, Bikeability.

Adrian Setter, Barnfield Way Copmanthorpe, York.

 

• FOLLOWING your recent publication of my letter about cyclist safety positioning where the road narrows, there has been some positive website support to counter the responses by Messrs McTernan and Benson.

The book Cyclecraft by John Franklin (ISBN 978 0 11 703740 3) is recommended reading for achieving the national cycle training “Bikability” standards. It gives specific advice for road narrowings, whether temporary or caused by permanent features like islands.

I quote: “Width restrictions reduce the amount of space available, and may significantly increase risk for a cyclist if a motorist tries to overtake in the limited room remaining.” It continues: “A cyclist can take protective action by adopting the primary riding position at the approach to the restriction.”

When I look back over my shoulder at the approach to a narrowing, I judge the speed and width of following vehicles, relative to the narrowed road ahead.

That alone is enough to encourage most drivers to hang back. It may be reinforced by then gradually moving away from the kerbside position. A hand signal may reinforce this move, but can cause confusion if there are junctions ahead.

I invariably give a thank-you wave to motorists who briefly hang back. If the narrowed road is wide enough for us both to pass, I remain near the kerbside.

Such are my true colours.

Paul Hepworth, Windmill Rise, York.

 

• I WAS surprised by Angela Brader’s complaint (Letters, January 12) about a cyclist hitting her mirror when her car was at a standstill in a traffic queue.

Does she not know that she should immediately retract her door or wing mirror when stationary in traffic?

Mike Usherwood, Mendip Close, Huntington, York.

Comments (7)

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12:45pm Tue 22 Jan 13

The Dasher says...

Mike Usherwood, you are suggesting that every driver of a vehicle when stationary in traffic should reach over, wind down the passenger window and retract their mirror. Upon seeing the lights change they should then do the opposite and put it back into the correct position for driving. You have obviously never driven a car in your life sir. I would add that the pandemonium and sheer danger involved hasn't even entered your pea sized brain. Only an imbecile could suggest such a theory (and I'm complimenting you by considering you to have reached the dizzy heights of imbecile by the way). You are a contaminate within the gene pool of common sense.
Mike Usherwood, you are suggesting that every driver of a vehicle when stationary in traffic should reach over, wind down the passenger window and retract their mirror. Upon seeing the lights change they should then do the opposite and put it back into the correct position for driving. You have obviously never driven a car in your life sir. I would add that the pandemonium and sheer danger involved hasn't even entered your pea sized brain. Only an imbecile could suggest such a theory (and I'm complimenting you by considering you to have reached the dizzy heights of imbecile by the way). You are a contaminate within the gene pool of common sense. The Dasher
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Tue 22 Jan 13

wildthing666 says...

I WAS surprised by Angela Brader’s complaint (Letters, January 12) about a cyclist hitting her mirror when her car was at a standstill in a traffic queue.

Does she not know that she should immediately retract her door or wing mirror when stationary in traffic?

Mike Usherwood, Mendip Close, Huntington, York.

If this was a car driver hitting another car mirror then it may be that if damage is caused a police officer may charge the moving vehicles driver with driving without due care and attention or another similar offence because if they have hit the mirror they are not paying attention to what they are doing or where they are going
I WAS surprised by Angela Brader’s complaint (Letters, January 12) about a cyclist hitting her mirror when her car was at a standstill in a traffic queue. Does she not know that she should immediately retract her door or wing mirror when stationary in traffic? Mike Usherwood, Mendip Close, Huntington, York. If this was a car driver hitting another car mirror then it may be that if damage is caused a police officer may charge the moving vehicles driver with driving without due care and attention or another similar offence because if they have hit the mirror they are not paying attention to what they are doing or where they are going wildthing666
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Tue 22 Jan 13

Buzz Light-year says...

The Dasher wrote:
Mike Usherwood, you are suggesting that every driver of a vehicle when stationary in traffic should reach over, wind down the passenger window and retract their mirror. Upon seeing the lights change they should then do the opposite and put it back into the correct position for driving. You have obviously never driven a car in your life sir. I would add that the pandemonium and sheer danger involved hasn't even entered your pea sized brain. Only an imbecile could suggest such a theory (and I'm complimenting you by considering you to have reached the dizzy heights of imbecile by the way). You are a contaminate within the gene pool of common sense.
I really really hope you are joining in with the joke here. Otherwise... well.


It's testament to Mr Usherwood's lifetime of curmudgeonly moaning that when he writes two tongue in cheek letters in a row, no-one gets the joke!

I got the joke Mr U. It's not funny but I got it.
[quote][p][bold]The Dasher[/bold] wrote: Mike Usherwood, you are suggesting that every driver of a vehicle when stationary in traffic should reach over, wind down the passenger window and retract their mirror. Upon seeing the lights change they should then do the opposite and put it back into the correct position for driving. You have obviously never driven a car in your life sir. I would add that the pandemonium and sheer danger involved hasn't even entered your pea sized brain. Only an imbecile could suggest such a theory (and I'm complimenting you by considering you to have reached the dizzy heights of imbecile by the way). You are a contaminate within the gene pool of common sense.[/p][/quote]I really really hope you are joining in with the joke here. Otherwise... well. It's testament to Mr Usherwood's lifetime of curmudgeonly moaning that when he writes two tongue in cheek letters in a row, no-one gets the joke! I got the joke Mr U. It's not funny but I got it. Buzz Light-year
  • Score: 0

2:50pm Tue 22 Jan 13

Sillybillies says...

Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are -
64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement.
Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129

60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp.
Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24

69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals.
Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)

In full it would be a very long list!
Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are - [quote]64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129 60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp. Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24 69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals. Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)[/quote] In full it would be a very long list! Sillybillies
  • Score: 0

2:52pm Tue 22 Jan 13

Buzz Light-year says...

Sillybillies wrote:
Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are -
64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129 60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp. Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24 69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals. Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)
In full it would be a very long list!
Irrelevant
[quote][p][bold]Sillybillies[/bold] wrote: Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are - [quote]64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129 60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp. Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24 69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals. Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)[/quote] In full it would be a very long list![/p][/quote]Irrelevant Buzz Light-year
  • Score: 0

3:17pm Tue 22 Jan 13

YSTClinguist says...

Buzz Light-year wrote:
Sillybillies wrote:
Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are -
64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129 60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp. Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24 69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals. Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)
In full it would be a very long list!
Irrelevant
He's probably just getting a dig in at cyclists whilst he can, because the subject of cars not giving cyclists enough room when overtaking, narrow roads and road obstructions has come up.

For anyone here who has seen an obstacle ahead, shoulder checked, stuck their right arm out, shoulder checked and then pulled out to circumvent said obstacle, and then been faced with angry horn blasts from behind, shouting and swearing and attempts to run you off the road, this would be relevant.
[quote][p][bold]Buzz Light-year[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sillybillies[/bold] wrote: Cyclecraft has no statutory basis and the advice to deliberately obstruct following vehicles requires testing in a court of law. On the other hand the Highway Code does contain directions backed up by statute, some of the ones commonly ignored by cyclists are - [quote]64 You MUST NOT cycle on a pavement. Laws HA 1835 sect 72 & R(S)A 1984, sect 129 60 At night your cycle MUST have white front and red rear lights lit. It MUST also be fitted with a red rear reflector (and amber pedal reflectors, if manufactured after 1/10/85). White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen. Flashing lights are permitted but it is recommended that cyclists who are riding in areas without street lighting use a steady front lamp. Law RVLR regs 13, 18 & 24 69 You MUST obey all traffic signs and traffic light signals. Laws RTA 1988 sect 36 & TSRGD reg 10(1)[/quote] In full it would be a very long list![/p][/quote]Irrelevant[/p][/quote]He's probably just getting a dig in at cyclists whilst he can, because the subject of cars not giving cyclists enough room when overtaking, narrow roads and road obstructions has come up. For anyone here who has seen an obstacle ahead, shoulder checked, stuck their right arm out, shoulder checked and then pulled out to circumvent said obstacle, and then been faced with angry horn blasts from behind, shouting and swearing and attempts to run you off the road, this would be relevant. YSTClinguist
  • Score: 0

9:36pm Tue 22 Jan 13

wolds way says...

Love the irony Mr U, but worried how many readers took you seriously?!!
Love the irony Mr U, but worried how many readers took you seriously?!! wolds way
  • Score: 0

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