Why not keep them in Belgium?

First published in Letters by

THERE is a distinct, two-tiered system of law in this country.

Our Government is tolerated by the EU when it opposes the EU wanting to seize control of our banks. But when it comes to the Government wanting to deport the likes of Abu Qatada, the judicial side of the EU says “No”.

This split between Britain and the EU makes a total farce of Britain’s judicial system.

Abu Qatada is, once again, freed and able to continue with his venom-filled rants against the country he hates, but is more than happy to stay in to avoid having to face trial in Jordan.

Following the EU decision to allow Qatada to be freed on bail, several years will pass before he comes up for deportation again.

Doubtless there are many other people like Abu Qatada awaiting deportation to other countries for trial but, for various reasons, the EU judges block these deportations.

So why not build a special open prison in Belgium to accommodate these people?

After all, the decision to block extradition is made in Belgium, so why not keep them in Belgium?

Philip Roe, Roman Avenue South, Stamford Bridge, York.

Comments (2)

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12:39pm Thu 15 Nov 12

Despairing Yorkie says...

We keep being told that there is no need for public libraries anymore because "everything" is available on the internet. Leaving aside the fact that that is untrue, the internet IS good for quick fact checking. Any chance the incredibly ignorant Mr Roe, and his ranting anecdotally-fuelled mates Quarrie, Usherwood et al could do a tiny, tiny bit of research before wasting paper, postage and space inflicting their saloo-bar prejudices on the rest of us. Ten seconds Googling would reveal:
a) The European Court of Human Rights is nothing to do with the EU. It originates in the post WW2 European Convention on Human Rights, opened for signature in Rome on 4 November 1950 and entered into force on 3 September 1953 (20 years before UK joined the EEC). The Convention gave effect to certain of the rights stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and established an
international judicial organ with jurisdiction to find against States that do not fulfil their undertakings. 47 states are party to the convention, including us. Nothing to do with EU membership.

b) The court is based in Strasbourg. Strasbourg is not in Belgium. There are these things called "maps" Mr Roe - very useful.

c) The judges at the European Court in Strasbourg ruled that Abu Qatada would NOT face ill-treatment if returned to Jordan. But the ECHR judge did not believe he would get a fair trial because a Jordanian court could use evidence against Abu Qatada that had been obtained from the torture of others.

d) The decision to release AQ from jail on the grounds that torture evidence would be used was taken by a BRITISH judge, Special Immigration Appeals Commission chairman Mr Justice Mitting.

e) The issue is the use of torture by the Jordanian authorities. Abu Qatada is the individual who's case happens currently to be highlighting this.

AQ seems to be a dangerous and possibly murderous fanatic who I would like out of this country tout de suite, but you have got to let the rule of law prevail, otherwise we all lose out. It's the tough cases where a rogue gets the benefit of the doubt that are hardest to swallow, but they are the ones that test that the law is working.
We keep being told that there is no need for public libraries anymore because "everything" is available on the internet. Leaving aside the fact that that is untrue, the internet IS good for quick fact checking. Any chance the incredibly ignorant Mr Roe, and his ranting anecdotally-fuelled mates Quarrie, Usherwood et al could do a tiny, tiny bit of research before wasting paper, postage and space inflicting their saloo-bar prejudices on the rest of us. Ten seconds Googling would reveal: a) The European Court of Human Rights is nothing to do with the EU. It originates in the post WW2 European Convention on Human Rights, opened for signature in Rome on 4 November 1950 and entered into force on 3 September 1953 (20 years before UK joined the EEC). The Convention gave effect to certain of the rights stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and established an international judicial organ with jurisdiction to find against States that do not fulfil their undertakings. 47 states are party to the convention, including us. Nothing to do with EU membership. b) The court is based in Strasbourg. Strasbourg is not in Belgium. There are these things called "maps" Mr Roe - very useful. c) The judges at the European Court in Strasbourg ruled that Abu Qatada would NOT face ill-treatment if returned to Jordan. But the ECHR judge did not believe he would get a fair trial because a Jordanian court could use evidence against Abu Qatada that had been obtained from the torture of others. d) The decision to release AQ from jail on the grounds that torture evidence would be used was taken by a BRITISH judge, Special Immigration Appeals Commission chairman Mr Justice Mitting. e) The issue is the use of torture by the Jordanian authorities. Abu Qatada is the individual who's case happens currently to be highlighting this. AQ seems to be a dangerous and possibly murderous fanatic who I would like out of this country tout de suite, but you have got to let the rule of law prevail, otherwise we all lose out. It's the tough cases where a rogue gets the benefit of the doubt that are hardest to swallow, but they are the ones that test that the law is working. Despairing Yorkie
  • Score: 0

1:15pm Fri 16 Nov 12

ShunGokuSatsu says...

Despairing Yorkie, you are an example to us all. Well done.

Mr. Roe: try reciting your line of reasoning aloud without going "hang on..."
Despairing Yorkie, you are an example to us all. Well done. Mr. Roe: try reciting your line of reasoning aloud without going "hang on..." ShunGokuSatsu
  • Score: 0

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