Yorkshire Wildlife Trust launches "Spurn Safari" at Spurn Point

Spurn Point

The Unimog vehicle that is being used for new tours.

First published in News
Last updated
York Press: Photograph of the Author by , News editor

A FAMOUS Yorkshire beauty spot is giving visitors a chance to experience it as never before - with its own safari trips.

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust has launched "Spurn Safari" at Spurn Point on the East Coast, giving new access to the national nature reserve, which is renowned for its wild flowers and birds.

The area was badly damaged in the tidal surge and storm late last year, and the public have since been unable to access the site by vehicle.

The Trust has now acquired a "unimog" off-road vehicle, previously used by the Dutch army, to take visitors on tours of the area.

Andrew Gibson, the Trust's Outer Humber Officer, said: “With Spurn peninsula evolving so rapidly and ability of public vehicular assess lost, Yorkshire Wildlife Trust recognised that things at Spurn would have to change.

"We were therefore delighted to receive the Unimog, which was last used by the Dutch army. The vehicles rear section will give visitors a unique opportunity to view the nature reserve whilst receiving a guided tour from knowledgeable staff. This will allow people to experience the reserve like never before and view first-hand how well the site is recovering following the devastating tidal surge last December.”

The vehicle can take up to 24 people on tours along the length of the nature reserve, reaching parts that are impossible to reach by other vehicles and difficult to reach on foot.

The first Spurn Safari was on July 20 and Andrew Mason, heritage officer at Spurn, said it was a success.

He said: "We all climbed into the Unimog and immediately someone mentioned the view as the elevation really does give superb views of the site. I gave a general talk about the main aspects of Spurn including its unique position, fantastic wildlife spectacles and the changes brought about by the storms of last winter."

The tours last around two and a half hours with a chance to have a short walk around the point area.

Further tours will be held from 2pm to 4pm this Saturday and noon to 2pm next Saturday. The cost £10 a head and must be booked by phoning 01904 659570 or emailing info@ywt.org.uk

* The nature reserve is also hosting the annual Spurn Migration Festival from September 5 to 7, giving the chance to see the spectacle of birds beginning their autumn migration. For ticket information or to book, phone 01904 659570 or email info@ywt.org.uk

Comments (2)

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8:12am Thu 14 Aug 14

dctyke says...

I drove unimogs for eight yrs in the mil. It had a terrible rep for turning over if the weight was not right in the back. There were fatalities, I hope they have done their research well and the vehicle is better designed than the ones I used.

On a second point, having seen the damage 'off roaders' do to green lanes is this a sensible thing to do in a delicate environment.
I drove unimogs for eight yrs in the mil. It had a terrible rep for turning over if the weight was not right in the back. There were fatalities, I hope they have done their research well and the vehicle is better designed than the ones I used. On a second point, having seen the damage 'off roaders' do to green lanes is this a sensible thing to do in a delicate environment. dctyke
  • Score: -9

9:58am Thu 14 Aug 14

Bo Jolly says...

Well, I walked for eight years in the boy scouts. Many people got blisters. Sometimes walkers died in winter if they weren't properly prepared. I hope that Yorkshire Wildlife Trust considered this before allowing people to walk on the site.

Having seen the damage that 'ramblers' do to overused footpaths/fences/wal
ls/livestock/litter etc is it really sensible to allow walkers in this sensitive environment...

Seriously though, this is an excellent idea. Spurn is an amazing place and this sounds like a great way to see it, especially if you can't do the four mile walk over rough ground for whatever reason.
Well, I walked for eight years in the boy scouts. Many people got blisters. Sometimes walkers died in winter if they weren't properly prepared. I hope that Yorkshire Wildlife Trust considered this before allowing people to walk on the site. Having seen the damage that 'ramblers' do to overused footpaths/fences/wal ls/livestock/litter etc is it really sensible to allow walkers in this sensitive environment... Seriously though, this is an excellent idea. Spurn is an amazing place and this sounds like a great way to see it, especially if you can't do the four mile walk over rough ground for whatever reason. Bo Jolly
  • Score: 13

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