Fresh development plans for historic Terry’s site

Construction begins at the Terry’s site following a nine-year gap since its closure

Construction begins at the Terry’s site following a nine-year gap since its closure

First published in News
Last updated

THE next phase of a major redevelopment of a York landmark is taking shape with a planning application submitted for hundreds of new homes at the formers Terry's chocolate factory.

House builder David Wilson Homes has applied for detailed planning permission for part two of its redevelopment of the site beside the Knavesmire.

If approved, the project will put 79 new houses and six apartment blocks containing 161 homes on land around the iconic factory buildings. The scheme was granted outline permission in October last year, and a smaller aspect of it was given detailed permission two months later and saw work begin this January.

This new aspect will bring the number of homes at the site up to 329, including 20 per cent of the properties which are to be affordable, the developers have said.

Peter Morris, development director at David Wilson Homes, said: “As we’ve already demonstrated through our progress on phase one, we’re keen to bring this new homes development to fruition and finally bring to an end the stagnation that this prominent site has suffered since Terry’s moved away.

“We’ve involved the community in shaping up our plans and feedback from both the Terry’s community forum and recent public consultation event regarding the proposed layout and designs has been very encouraging and largely supportive. There has been tremendous interest already from potential buyers, including from those who attended our consultation events.”

The application includes a straight central boulevard connecting the residential areas and the redeveloped factory buildings, and pedestrian priority within the centre of the site with one major vehicle entrance and five pedestrian or cycle entrances.

The developers have also said tree retention is a major feature of the plans, along with new planting, and the site will include an urban square designed to become the heart of the development.

Officers from City of York Council will now review the submission and make their recommendation to the planning committee, which will consider the application later this year.

The construction of the first homes is already well underway and these are expected to be available for occupation early in the New Year, but these new plans do not touch on the historic disused factory buildings, which are owned and are being renovated by Henry Boot Developments.

Comments (20)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:20pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Knavesmire view says...

I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location.

Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression).

Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.
I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location. Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression). Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world. Knavesmire view
  • Score: -8

1:08pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Badgers Drift says...

the absence of the usual comments by messrs Alexander, Simpson-Laing and Merrett are conspicuous by their absence - I wonder why?

I suspect that it is because of the latest housing completionnumbers for York, which are embarrassing for them, Labour and the council.

Look at the last three years net completions:-

2011/12: 321 (Record low)
2012/13: 482 less 124 student accommodation = 358 (3rd lowest ever if student accom excluded)
2013/14: 345 (2nd lowest ever)

To use a favourite Labour expression, York's housing numbers under James alexander's administration are a disaster and flat-lining! LOL

Never mind, he can always blame the cause - the 50% affordable housing policy which was introduced by the Lib-Dems, even though it was a labour idea (proposed by Dave Merrett in November 2002 under Labour) but adopted in April 2005.

So here we are, the economy getting better and housing in general in the UK, but, not in York!

What about the 'Get York Building' team at York Council - i thought they were stimulating the sites that have stalled? Another failure? Yes, I think so.
the absence of the usual comments by messrs Alexander, Simpson-Laing and Merrett are conspicuous by their absence - I wonder why? I suspect that it is because of the latest housing completionnumbers for York, which are embarrassing for them, Labour and the council. Look at the last three years net completions:- 2011/12: 321 (Record low) 2012/13: 482 less 124 student accommodation = 358 (3rd lowest ever if student accom excluded) 2013/14: 345 (2nd lowest ever) To use a favourite Labour expression, York's housing numbers under James alexander's administration are a disaster and flat-lining! LOL Never mind, he can always blame the cause - the 50% affordable housing policy which was introduced by the Lib-Dems, even though it was a labour idea (proposed by Dave Merrett in November 2002 under Labour) but adopted in April 2005. So here we are, the economy getting better and housing in general in the UK, but, not in York! What about the 'Get York Building' team at York Council - i thought they were stimulating the sites that have stalled? Another failure? Yes, I think so. Badgers Drift
  • Score: -21

1:27pm Wed 30 Jul 14

suzymf says...

I think it is completely inappropriate to dwarf one of York’s most beautiful and historical landmarks with these very ugly buildings which are now looking likely to be six stories high. The original buildings are part of York’s charm and the reason our beautiful city attracts thousands of tourists. Whilst appreciating the need for new housing why on earth would the council agree to something so distasteful, especially when the original planning application stated these buildings would be no more than three stories high?
I think it is completely inappropriate to dwarf one of York’s most beautiful and historical landmarks with these very ugly buildings which are now looking likely to be six stories high. The original buildings are part of York’s charm and the reason our beautiful city attracts thousands of tourists. Whilst appreciating the need for new housing why on earth would the council agree to something so distasteful, especially when the original planning application stated these buildings would be no more than three stories high? suzymf
  • Score: -8

1:49pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Pinza-C55 says...

Knavesmire view wrote:
I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location.

Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression).

Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.
Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York.
[quote][p][bold]Knavesmire view[/bold] wrote: I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location. Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression). Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.[/p][/quote]Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 17

2:33pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Jalymo says...

More vehicles from this site leaving the city on Tadcaster Road, either for the Park and Ride or to get to the A64 or A1237. During term time the constant need for students to cross the road at a pelican crossing to get to the College, causes huge tailbacks already. Oh well, I suppose The Council will be happy to see the traffic situation get worse.
More vehicles from this site leaving the city on Tadcaster Road, either for the Park and Ride or to get to the A64 or A1237. During term time the constant need for students to cross the road at a pelican crossing to get to the College, causes huge tailbacks already. Oh well, I suppose The Council will be happy to see the traffic situation get worse. Jalymo
  • Score: -4

3:31pm Wed 30 Jul 14

piaggio1 says...

Get york building team ?????
What a fantastic opportunity to now employ some lacky on £700+ a day ..no doubt a failed student on the very far left...
Got to keep their mates appy......
Get york building team ????? What a fantastic opportunity to now employ some lacky on £700+ a day ..no doubt a failed student on the very far left... Got to keep their mates appy...... piaggio1
  • Score: -4

3:32pm Wed 30 Jul 14

barcooter says...

York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there.
York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there. barcooter
  • Score: -10

3:37pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Dave Ruddock says...

Great to see brown sites for housing, Cant see Taddy road having problems unless people are getting lost, but do see problems if they wish to use the Bypass, like all York residents Patients required. Its hidden away and we need new housing.
so Great Great Great
Great to see brown sites for housing, Cant see Taddy road having problems unless people are getting lost, but do see problems if they wish to use the Bypass, like all York residents Patients required. Its hidden away and we need new housing. so Great Great Great Dave Ruddock
  • Score: -4

4:51pm Wed 30 Jul 14

notpedallingpaul says...

suzymf wrote:
I think it is completely inappropriate to dwarf one of York’s most beautiful and historical landmarks with these very ugly buildings which are now looking likely to be six stories high. The original buildings are part of York’s charm and the reason our beautiful city attracts thousands of tourists. Whilst appreciating the need for new housing why on earth would the council agree to something so distasteful, especially when the original planning application stated these buildings would be no more than three stories high?
So we just let the site sit there with no development and growing weeds just because you don't like the buildings, it would end up just like the other eyesore near me - the former barbican swimming pool complex!
I am all for the development at least there will be new homes in York, but I hope the developer is screwed to the ground where the tree preservation is concerned, that is something that I and a lot of other people would be angry about if those trees were removed.
The main factory building is in a terrible state as we comment, it wouldn't surprise me if it's demolished on the grounds that it is too far gone and would be uneconomic to re-furnish it.
[quote][p][bold]suzymf[/bold] wrote: I think it is completely inappropriate to dwarf one of York’s most beautiful and historical landmarks with these very ugly buildings which are now looking likely to be six stories high. The original buildings are part of York’s charm and the reason our beautiful city attracts thousands of tourists. Whilst appreciating the need for new housing why on earth would the council agree to something so distasteful, especially when the original planning application stated these buildings would be no more than three stories high?[/p][/quote]So we just let the site sit there with no development and growing weeds just because you don't like the buildings, it would end up just like the other eyesore near me - the former barbican swimming pool complex! I am all for the development at least there will be new homes in York, but I hope the developer is screwed to the ground where the tree preservation is concerned, that is something that I and a lot of other people would be angry about if those trees were removed. The main factory building is in a terrible state as we comment, it wouldn't surprise me if it's demolished on the grounds that it is too far gone and would be uneconomic to re-furnish it. notpedallingpaul
  • Score: 6

5:04pm Wed 30 Jul 14

SRT_CM says...

barcooter wrote:
York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there.
So, what about the people growing up who'll live and work in the city? You want them shipped out to another town or city because in your opinion we don't need more houses?

Your second sentence also makes zero sense. Well done.
[quote][p][bold]barcooter[/bold] wrote: York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there.[/p][/quote]So, what about the people growing up who'll live and work in the city? You want them shipped out to another town or city because in your opinion we don't need more houses? Your second sentence also makes zero sense. Well done. SRT_CM
  • Score: 10

9:09am Thu 31 Jul 14

julia brica says...

There are disused airfields all around York.
There is a great lump of land in the Tear Drop rail site.
There are council owned lumps of land all around York.
Housing crisis answer .......... "Prefabs" or the modern version of them. For rent only and strict conditions which would be enforced.
They do it in France and Germany why not here.
There are disused airfields all around York. There is a great lump of land in the Tear Drop rail site. There are council owned lumps of land all around York. Housing crisis answer .......... "Prefabs" or the modern version of them. For rent only and strict conditions which would be enforced. They do it in France and Germany why not here. julia brica
  • Score: -9

9:34am Thu 31 Jul 14

Knavesmire view says...

Pinza-C55 wrote:
Knavesmire view wrote:
I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location.

Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression).

Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.
Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York.
No it isn't going to be a factory again, but just because the original owners abandoned it doesn't mean we should abandon it too and turn it over to cheap, ugly housing.

It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy.
[quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Knavesmire view[/bold] wrote: I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location. Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression). Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.[/p][/quote]Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York.[/p][/quote]No it isn't going to be a factory again, but just because the original owners abandoned it doesn't mean we should abandon it too and turn it over to cheap, ugly housing. It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy. Knavesmire view
  • Score: -8

9:39am Thu 31 Jul 14

SRT_CM says...

"It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy."

And use it for...?
"It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy." And use it for...? SRT_CM
  • Score: 10

9:53am Thu 31 Jul 14

barcooter says...

SRT_CM wrote:
barcooter wrote:
York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there.
So, what about the people growing up who'll live and work in the city? You want them shipped out to another town or city because in your opinion we don't need more houses?

Your second sentence also makes zero sense. Well done.
There is no housing shortage in York for people who can afford to live there, in fact there's plenty of choice. Do you think they are building a council estate on the Terry's site? Get a grip.
[quote][p][bold]SRT_CM[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]barcooter[/bold] wrote: York doesn't need more houses and more people, this is not sustainable anymore. Yes there might be a housing shortage but not for people who can afford to live there.[/p][/quote]So, what about the people growing up who'll live and work in the city? You want them shipped out to another town or city because in your opinion we don't need more houses? Your second sentence also makes zero sense. Well done.[/p][/quote]There is no housing shortage in York for people who can afford to live there, in fact there's plenty of choice. Do you think they are building a council estate on the Terry's site? Get a grip. barcooter
  • Score: -14

10:09am Thu 31 Jul 14

SRT_CM says...

Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against.

Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet!

If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum?

We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact.

Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer.

There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different.
Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against. Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet! If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum? We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact. Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer. There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different. SRT_CM
  • Score: 13

10:22am Thu 31 Jul 14

meme says...

It just shows from the comments on here that its impossible to make everyone happy all the time
we should be pleased these homes are being built as York needs more housing
Its accepted the housing needs to be more affordable but that's to do with demand and supply and when you look at the supply figures which are frankly dreadful despite the councils get York building team and all the rhetoric about how well they are doing ..its very unlikely that supply will increase much
Planning consents take forever to get are costly and constraints make development in York difficult and expensive. Much of this can be laid at the door of the Council
Densities will have to be high if we are to maximise use of land to satisfy those who want minimal incursions into the greenbelt which means going higher and height means additional cost!
York has to grow to remain competitive and hopefully attract new jobs and new blood. Those who want it to stagnate are living in a fantasy world.
If we want a world that our kids can live and work in this is the way forward but I just wish CoYC could get their act together and stop interfering as much in design/etc and let people get on with providing the homes that the market wants which will range from smaller cheaper homes to expensive IE homes for all
It just shows from the comments on here that its impossible to make everyone happy all the time we should be pleased these homes are being built as York needs more housing Its accepted the housing needs to be more affordable but that's to do with demand and supply and when you look at the supply figures which are frankly dreadful despite the councils get York building team and all the rhetoric about how well they are doing ..its very unlikely that supply will increase much Planning consents take forever to get are costly and constraints make development in York difficult and expensive. Much of this can be laid at the door of the Council [but not all] Densities will have to be high if we are to maximise use of land to satisfy those who want minimal incursions into the greenbelt which means going higher and height means additional cost! York has to grow to remain competitive and hopefully attract new jobs and new blood. Those who want it to stagnate are living in a fantasy world. If we want a world that our kids can live and work in this is the way forward but I just wish CoYC could get their act together and stop interfering as much in design/etc and let people get on with providing the homes that the market wants which will range from smaller cheaper homes to expensive IE homes for all meme
  • Score: 9

2:14pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Pinza-C55 says...

Knavesmire view wrote:
Pinza-C55 wrote:
Knavesmire view wrote:
I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location.

Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression).

Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.
Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York.
No it isn't going to be a factory again, but just because the original owners abandoned it doesn't mean we should abandon it too and turn it over to cheap, ugly housing.

It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy.
So what do you suggest should be the use for this enormous, partly listed building which is well out of the city centre?
The options are
1) Factory.
2) Housing/mixed use.
3) Leave it derelict
4) Very large nightclub.
5) Rescind the listing and flatten it.
6) Other option of your choosing.

The floor is yours.
[quote][p][bold]Knavesmire view[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pinza-C55[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Knavesmire view[/bold] wrote: I still think this is a massive waste of a brilliant location. Yes we need more homes and brown field sites should be where we build them first, but we could have had a real leagcy on this site for the whole city, rather than hundreds of homes (which quite frankly looked pretty ugly in the artist impression). Sadly at the end of the day it comes down to money, and after year's of non-development at least something is now being done, just not what I would have wanted in an ideal world.[/p][/quote]Legacy such as what ? The owners moved their production to Eastern Europe. It's never going to be a factory again even if any manufacturing industry was moving to York.[/p][/quote]No it isn't going to be a factory again, but just because the original owners abandoned it doesn't mean we should abandon it too and turn it over to cheap, ugly housing. It is an historic building and part of York's history, it deserves to stay that way which is what I meant by legacy.[/p][/quote]So what do you suggest should be the use for this enormous, partly listed building which is well out of the city centre? The options are 1) Factory. 2) Housing/mixed use. 3) Leave it derelict 4) Very large nightclub. 5) Rescind the listing and flatten it. 6) Other option of your choosing. The floor is yours. Pinza-C55
  • Score: 8

2:48pm Thu 31 Jul 14

barcooter says...

SRT_CM wrote:
Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against.

Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet!

If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum?

We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact.

Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer.

There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different.
I would love to live in York where I grew up but unfortunately it's the employment equivalent of disneyland which is why I live and work in the southeast where there are much better paid jobs but with equivalent house prices to York. And don't start with 'oh so everyone should move down South'. People do not have a god given right to live in nice places, sorry, fact of life. But no, let's just carry on building right up to the ring road and see how attractive the place is for tourists and shoppers then. I fail to see how a load of overpriced shoe boxes bought by young professionals working outside York is going to help future generations. Flattening the site and building high density social housing might.
[quote][p][bold]SRT_CM[/bold] wrote: Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against. Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet! If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum? We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact. Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer. There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different.[/p][/quote]I would love to live in York where I grew up but unfortunately it's the employment equivalent of disneyland which is why I live and work in the southeast where there are much better paid jobs but with equivalent house prices to York. And don't start with 'oh so everyone should move down South'. People do not have a god given right to live in nice places, sorry, fact of life. But no, let's just carry on building right up to the ring road and see how attractive the place is for tourists and shoppers then. I fail to see how a load of overpriced shoe boxes bought by young professionals working outside York is going to help future generations. Flattening the site and building high density social housing might. barcooter
  • Score: -13

3:16pm Thu 31 Jul 14

SRT_CM says...

I wouldn't advocate anyone move down South personally, but that's a separate issue.

The salaries in York are depressingly low compared to the cost of living there (hence why I work in Leeds), but I'm sure you'd agree that not everyone living in York can be working in the surrounding cities to be able to afford it!

At least some of the population must be able to manage on what they earn in York, surely?

No-one's saying that people have a God-given right to live in nice places either, but what you seem to be advocating is that everyone who's grown up in York will have to leave when they want to buy a house.

And as far as I know, tourists and visitors don't come to York to marvel at our wondrous housing estates and neighbourhoods, so chances are they wouldn't be interested in the residential areas of York at all. Regardless of whether they're built up to the ring road or not.
I wouldn't advocate anyone move down South personally, but that's a separate issue. The salaries in York are depressingly low compared to the cost of living there (hence why I work in Leeds), but I'm sure you'd agree that not everyone living in York can be working in the surrounding cities to be able to afford it! At least some of the population must be able to manage on what they earn in York, surely? No-one's saying that people have a God-given right to live in nice places either, but what you seem to be advocating is that everyone who's grown up in York will have to leave when they want to buy a house. And as far as I know, tourists and visitors don't come to York to marvel at our wondrous housing estates and neighbourhoods, so chances are they wouldn't be interested in the residential areas of York at all. Regardless of whether they're built up to the ring road or not. SRT_CM
  • Score: 10

9:04pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Pinza-C55 says...

barcooter wrote:
SRT_CM wrote:
Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against.

Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet!

If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum?

We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact.

Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer.

There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different.
I would love to live in York where I grew up but unfortunately it's the employment equivalent of disneyland which is why I live and work in the southeast where there are much better paid jobs but with equivalent house prices to York. And don't start with 'oh so everyone should move down South'. People do not have a god given right to live in nice places, sorry, fact of life. But no, let's just carry on building right up to the ring road and see how attractive the place is for tourists and shoppers then. I fail to see how a load of overpriced shoe boxes bought by young professionals working outside York is going to help future generations. Flattening the site and building high density social housing might.
If you made a decision to leave York to further your employment prospects why should you have any interest in the employment or housing prospects of those who choose to stay?
[quote][p][bold]barcooter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SRT_CM[/bold] wrote: Head. Banging. Brick. Wall. Against. Words that instantly spring to mind, since you didn't bother to read my post. Specifically the question about the children and teenagers currently growing up in the city who may not necessarily want to move away. So "York doesn't need more people" is a bit of a silly statement, since the people are already here, they just don't need to buy a house yet! If you're living in some fantasy land where York has plentiful housing as long as you've got a few quid, answer the original question about how younger people who already live in the city, having been born here, are going to find somewhere to live? Or should they all live with their parents ad infinitum? We need more housing, a wider range of housing, including lower-cost housing for the young. Granted that might not be what's happening at the Terry's site, but it's still a fact. Also, as more expensive housing is built it will free-up the more affordable as people up-size. Me for example. I bought my house in 2008, and am now out-growing it. I'll soon be moving to somewhere bigger, freeing-up a smaller, cheaper house for potentially a first-time buyer. There's LOADS of room for new houses around York (the debate it where they're built). Cities expand, York is no different.[/p][/quote]I would love to live in York where I grew up but unfortunately it's the employment equivalent of disneyland which is why I live and work in the southeast where there are much better paid jobs but with equivalent house prices to York. And don't start with 'oh so everyone should move down South'. People do not have a god given right to live in nice places, sorry, fact of life. But no, let's just carry on building right up to the ring road and see how attractive the place is for tourists and shoppers then. I fail to see how a load of overpriced shoe boxes bought by young professionals working outside York is going to help future generations. Flattening the site and building high density social housing might.[/p][/quote]If you made a decision to leave York to further your employment prospects why should you have any interest in the employment or housing prospects of those who choose to stay? Pinza-C55
  • Score: 8

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree