Richard III's ‘funeral crown’ goes on display in York

York Press: Jane Stockdale of York Archaeological Trust with the crown which is on display Jane Stockdale of York Archaeological Trust with the crown which is on display

HE was buried 600 years ago in a hurriedly dug grave with none of the traditional royal pomp and ceremony, but now the regalia Richard III never had is to go on display.

A "funeral crown" created especially for Richard III by a leading Ricardian historian is on show at the Richard III Experience in York.

Dr John Ashdown-Hill, who was involved in the archaeological dig that discovered Richard's remains, commissioned a valuable 15th century-style coronet in tribute to Richard, and it is now on display to visitors at the museum in Monk Bar, before it starts a tour of the country and plays a part in the king's reburial.

The crown was created by medieval jewellery expert George Easton, who took his inspiration for its design from historical sources relating to the infamous monarch, including illustrations and surviving relics from the period.

Dr Ashdown-Hill said: “The crown is plated with gold, with the circle set enamelled with white roses and pearls. On the roses are set rubies and sapphires, representing the livery colours of the house of York. The crosses of the crown have more enamelled white roses, set with emeralds and turquoises.”

Dr Ashdown-Hill was inspired to commission the crown when he was carrying Richard's newly-discovered remains, covered with a Royal standard, away from the dig in Leicester.

He had been involved in the search from the start, tracing Richard's living relatives descended from his sister Anne of York through an all female line, and researching on the modern location of his grave.

Housed in Monk Bar, one of the medieval gateways to York, the Richard III Experience has been open since April 2014 and explores the monarch’s influence on the city of York.

It is run by the JORVIK Group and director Sarah Maltby said: "Richard III’s reign may have been short but his influence on York cannot be underestimated. The Richard III Experience is the perfect place for people to explore Richard’s life and reign and we are excited to have access to the replica crown to help to give our visitors insight into the majesty of medieval kings.”

The crown will be on display there until early July.

Comments (2)

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3:09pm Wed 28 May 14

Cornelia W says...

I write this comment as both a distant relation of King Richard III and as a professional Genealogist. Until now, I have not expressed an opinion as to the discovery of his remains or the plans being made for them, as I am an American by birth. As Richard III was King of England, anywhere in England might seem suitable, but I confess that I was hoping he would wind up either in York or buried with his family. But, to be fair, he was a warrior king, and many warriors wind up buried where they have died. By tracing his sister's mitochondrial DNA, the researchers are tracing his maternal line. His mother was Lady Cecily Neville, her mother was Lady Joan Beaufort (buried in Lincoln Cathedral), her mother was Catherine Roet (buried in Lincoln Cathedral), and so forth. While most of the lines closely related to the House of Plantagenet have died out or daughtered out, there are still living descendants. While the Tudors did what they could to erase the Plantagenet family, and Shakespeare's play Richard III was a masterpiece of propaganda in this sense,
perhaps it can best be said that everyone deserves a resting place of dignity and peace.
I write this comment as both a distant relation of King Richard III and as a professional Genealogist. Until now, I have not expressed an opinion as to the discovery of his remains or the plans being made for them, as I am an American by birth. As Richard III was King of England, anywhere in England might seem suitable, but I confess that I was hoping he would wind up either in York or buried with his family. But, to be fair, he was a warrior king, and many warriors wind up buried where they have died. By tracing his sister's mitochondrial DNA, the researchers are tracing his maternal line. His mother was Lady Cecily Neville, her mother was Lady Joan Beaufort (buried in Lincoln Cathedral), her mother was Catherine Roet (buried in Lincoln Cathedral), and so forth. While most of the lines closely related to the House of Plantagenet have died out or daughtered out, there are still living descendants. While the Tudors did what they could to erase the Plantagenet family, and Shakespeare's play Richard III was a masterpiece of propaganda in this sense, perhaps it can best be said that everyone deserves a resting place of dignity and peace. Cornelia W
  • Score: 23

3:52pm Wed 28 May 14

Lamplighter says...

He wasn't buried 600 years ago, he died in 1485
He wasn't buried 600 years ago, he died in 1485 Lamplighter
  • Score: 5

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