£45,786 - what the average wage in York should be to match house prices, says charity

First-time buyers are finding it  difficult to get on the property ladder

First-time buyers are finding it difficult to get on the property ladder

Published in News York Press: Photograph of the Author by , Chief reporter

THE average wage in York would need to rise by £22,000 to keep up with soaring house prices, new research has shown.

The charity Shelter said it had examined wage and house price inflation since 1997 in every area of the region.

The information was then used to calculate what average annual earnings would be if they had risen at the same rate as house prices.

A spokeswoman said the results were “staggering”.

For example, in York, the average wage of £23,436 would need to increase to £45,786 to match the rise in property prices over the period.

“In Harrogate, the average annual salary would need to increase by more £25,000 to be in line with the rise in house prices,” she said.

The gap is almost as big in Selby, where average annual salary would need to rise from £24,482 to £49,066.

In Ryedale, average pay would need to rise from £20,389 to £38,207, in East Yorkshire from £21,424 to £38,956 and in Hambleton from £21,507 to £38,755.

“Averages earners in Scarborough would need the smallest pay rise, but here over £14,000 would still need to be added on to the average salary to put it in line with the rise in house prices,” she said.

The spokeswoman said the impact of the housing shortage had been widespread, with the latest census showing a five per cent drop in the proportion of home owners in Yorkshire & the Humber and across the country, the gap between wages and house prices had continued to grow.

“In the late 1990s, the average house cost five times the average salary, but by 2012 it had jumped to ten times.

“This leaves thousands of people priced out of the property market and with no choice but to live in unstable private rented homes, or remain in their childhood bedroom well into adulthood.

“Shelter is calling on the Government to address the serious shortage of affordable homes as a matter of urgency, and give young people and families who work hard and save money each month the chance of a stable home.”

Comments (22)

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10:03am Wed 12 Feb 14

roskoboskovic says...

this just confirms the sorry state of affairs in york where greedy landlords basically dictate the life choice of our young people.market forces mean that they get sky high rents from a never ending procession of students who can afford the costs through low rate loans/student loans and mum and dad.the council want to build more houses a large proportion of which will be snapped up by the speculators thus perpetuating the vicious circle.on a low or minimum wage not only can our kids have no hope of a mortgage they can no longer afford to rent whilst ycc rake in millions in council tax.
this just confirms the sorry state of affairs in york where greedy landlords basically dictate the life choice of our young people.market forces mean that they get sky high rents from a never ending procession of students who can afford the costs through low rate loans/student loans and mum and dad.the council want to build more houses a large proportion of which will be snapped up by the speculators thus perpetuating the vicious circle.on a low or minimum wage not only can our kids have no hope of a mortgage they can no longer afford to rent whilst ycc rake in millions in council tax. roskoboskovic
  • Score: 49

10:20am Wed 12 Feb 14

The Great Buda says...

Nothing further to add to roskoboskovic comment. Spot on sir.
Nothing further to add to roskoboskovic comment. Spot on sir. The Great Buda
  • Score: 20

11:14am Wed 12 Feb 14

take 5 says...

these greedy landlords should be taxed to high heavens and should be made to pay council tax on these student propertys why should we pay more council tax to substidize all these student propertys not paying any ?
these greedy landlords should be taxed to high heavens and should be made to pay council tax on these student propertys why should we pay more council tax to substidize all these student propertys not paying any ? take 5
  • Score: 29

11:36am Wed 12 Feb 14

Oaklands Resident says...

Agreed, some private landlord prices are a rip off.

However the Shelter figures make the mistake of talking about "averages".

A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000. With government mortgage subsidies that should be within reach of a couple on "average" York salaries.

The Council could help by purchasing properties like this and adding them to the pool of homes available at "social" rents.

After all they are sitting on a housing account surplus which ahs now grown to over £13 million.
Agreed, some private landlord prices are a rip off. However the Shelter figures make the mistake of talking about "averages". A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000. With government mortgage subsidies that should be within reach of a couple on "average" York salaries. The Council could help by purchasing properties like this and adding them to the pool of homes available at "social" rents. After all they are sitting on a housing account surplus which ahs now grown to over £13 million. Oaklands Resident
  • Score: 15

11:37am Wed 12 Feb 14

voiceofnormalpeople says...

The more eastern Europeans working here for penny's the more the average wage will be below 15k. I would be surprised if it was even that high.
The more eastern Europeans working here for penny's the more the average wage will be below 15k. I would be surprised if it was even that high. voiceofnormalpeople
  • Score: -6

12:10pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Zetkin says...

I'm not sure that taxing the profiteering landlords will help hard-pressed tenants very much; they'll simply increase the rents further to make up the shortfall in their income.

A better way in my view is to reinstate the system that was in place between the first world war and 1988 when Thatcher abolished it: rent control.

A fair rent should be established for each area and each type of property, and any landlord found to be charging more should be subject to criminal charges.

If the landlords can't make enough money to sate their greed, they can always sell their excess properties and try to get a job and earn an honest living like the rest of us.
I'm not sure that taxing the profiteering landlords will help hard-pressed tenants very much; they'll simply increase the rents further to make up the shortfall in their income. A better way in my view is to reinstate the system that was in place between the first world war and 1988 when Thatcher abolished it: rent control. A fair rent should be established for each area and each type of property, and any landlord found to be charging more should be subject to criminal charges. If the landlords can't make enough money to sate their greed, they can always sell their excess properties and try to get a job and earn an honest living like the rest of us. Zetkin
  • Score: 27

12:37pm Wed 12 Feb 14

straylandsbloke says...

take 5 wrote:
these greedy landlords should be taxed to high heavens and should be made to pay council tax on these student propertys why should we pay more council tax to substidize all these student propertys not paying any ?
Why do you think you pay more coucil tax as a result of exemption? the government reimburses councils for student exempt properties.

Admittedly this comes from general taxation so indireclty you pay more but so does everbody else, therefore you could argue everbody else is subsidizing your council tax.

Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think.
[quote][p][bold]take 5[/bold] wrote: these greedy landlords should be taxed to high heavens and should be made to pay council tax on these student propertys why should we pay more council tax to substidize all these student propertys not paying any ?[/p][/quote]Why do you think you pay more coucil tax as a result of exemption? the government reimburses councils for student exempt properties. Admittedly this comes from general taxation so indireclty you pay more but so does everbody else, therefore you could argue everbody else is subsidizing your council tax. Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think. straylandsbloke
  • Score: 8

12:42pm Wed 12 Feb 14

nasrudin says...

Oaklands Resident wrote:
Agreed, some private landlord prices are a rip off.

However the Shelter figures make the mistake of talking about "averages".

A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000. With government mortgage subsidies that should be within reach of a couple on "average" York salaries.

The Council could help by purchasing properties like this and adding them to the pool of homes available at "social" rents.

After all they are sitting on a housing account surplus which ahs now grown to over £13 million.
I think you'll find that:

A) this is the lowest priced 2 bed flats in york -- certainly not an average
B) it's actually a guide price / offers over £110k (according to rightmove)
C) that's only for 80% ownership...

But yes, for something over £110,000 you can buy 80% of a flat.

You're right in that averages will be pushed up by top-end property, but that doesn't mean they're not correct overall in that prices are too high for most people. Chosing the lowest of the low available now as an example is just as disingenuous.

Perhaps a better measure would be the average price for the lower quartile (by number available) of flats?

Definitely a (hefty) tax on rental income would drive property prices down, At the moment you can buy a house on an interest only mortgage and make a mint renting it out, but only if you have the money up front for a deposit.

And that's the key problem -- how are you meant to be able to save up £30k for a 20% deposit if you're living by yourself, on an average wage and paying £600 per month in rent!

Personally, I don't think there's any governmental interest in dealing with the problems in the rental market as it's propping up the collapsing house prices, and no government wants house prices to come down as it's unpopular with house owners.

If many more houses were built, perhaps we'd see house prices coming down 5% per year -- I'll vote for that!
[quote][p][bold]Oaklands Resident[/bold] wrote: Agreed, some private landlord prices are a rip off. However the Shelter figures make the mistake of talking about "averages". A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000. With government mortgage subsidies that should be within reach of a couple on "average" York salaries. The Council could help by purchasing properties like this and adding them to the pool of homes available at "social" rents. After all they are sitting on a housing account surplus which ahs now grown to over £13 million.[/p][/quote]I think you'll find that: A) this is the lowest priced 2 bed flats in york -- certainly not an average B) it's actually a guide price / offers over £110k (according to rightmove) C) that's only for 80% ownership... But yes, for something over £110,000 you can buy 80% of a flat. You're right in that averages will be pushed up by top-end property, but that doesn't mean they're not correct overall in that prices are too high for most people. Chosing the lowest of the low available now as an example is just as disingenuous. Perhaps a better measure would be the average price for the lower quartile (by number available) of flats? Definitely a (hefty) tax on rental income would drive property prices down, At the moment you can buy a house on an interest only mortgage and make a mint renting it out, but only if you have the money up front for a deposit. And that's the key problem -- how are you meant to be able to save up £30k for a 20% deposit if you're living by yourself, on an average wage and paying £600 per month in rent! Personally, I don't think there's any governmental interest in dealing with the problems in the rental market as it's propping up the collapsing house prices, and no government wants house prices to come down as it's unpopular with house owners. If many more houses were built, perhaps we'd see house prices coming down 5% per year -- I'll vote for that! nasrudin
  • Score: 14

12:49pm Wed 12 Feb 14

take 5 says...

straylander if thats the case then were all paying more income tax for these student houses then if the landlord should be made to pay council tax out of his huge profits as for students adding to local busineses so would familys living in these propertys
straylander if thats the case then were all paying more income tax for these student houses then if the landlord should be made to pay council tax out of his huge profits as for students adding to local busineses so would familys living in these propertys take 5
  • Score: 7

1:34pm Wed 12 Feb 14

CaroleBaines says...

Zetkin wrote:
I'm not sure that taxing the profiteering landlords will help hard-pressed tenants very much; they'll simply increase the rents further to make up the shortfall in their income.

A better way in my view is to reinstate the system that was in place between the first world war and 1988 when Thatcher abolished it: rent control.

A fair rent should be established for each area and each type of property, and any landlord found to be charging more should be subject to criminal charges.

If the landlords can't make enough money to sate their greed, they can always sell their excess properties and try to get a job and earn an honest living like the rest of us.
Absolutely. Landlords might snub their noses at the unemployed and disabled, but the biggest drain on the public purse is inflated rents going straight into landlords' pockets.
Rent cap = decent rents = lower welfare payments for those out of work. No wonder this government were talking about shipping families out of London to places like Stoke.
Where will it all end?
And before some clown calls me a Marxist, I am equally appalled at Labour not reversing the rent cap in the years they had power. All as bad as each other. UK is a rich man's world nowadays and the rest are left to sink.
[quote][p][bold]Zetkin[/bold] wrote: I'm not sure that taxing the profiteering landlords will help hard-pressed tenants very much; they'll simply increase the rents further to make up the shortfall in their income. A better way in my view is to reinstate the system that was in place between the first world war and 1988 when Thatcher abolished it: rent control. A fair rent should be established for each area and each type of property, and any landlord found to be charging more should be subject to criminal charges. If the landlords can't make enough money to sate their greed, they can always sell their excess properties and try to get a job and earn an honest living like the rest of us.[/p][/quote]Absolutely. Landlords might snub their noses at the unemployed and disabled, but the biggest drain on the public purse is inflated rents going straight into landlords' pockets. Rent cap = decent rents = lower welfare payments for those out of work. No wonder this government were talking about shipping families out of London to places like Stoke. Where will it all end? And before some clown calls me a Marxist, I am equally appalled at Labour not reversing the rent cap in the years they had power. All as bad as each other. UK is a rich man's world nowadays and the rest are left to sink. CaroleBaines
  • Score: 14

1:44pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Jiffy says...

Being on the 'average wage' would be a start for many
Being on the 'average wage' would be a start for many Jiffy
  • Score: 13

3:22pm Wed 12 Feb 14

Mr. Marcus says...

roskoboskovic wrote:
this just confirms the sorry state of affairs in york where greedy landlords basically dictate the life choice of our young people.market forces mean that they get sky high rents from a never ending procession of students who can afford the costs through low rate loans/student loans and mum and dad.the council want to build more houses a large proportion of which will be snapped up by the speculators thus perpetuating the vicious circle.on a low or minimum wage not only can our kids have no hope of a mortgage they can no longer afford to rent whilst ycc rake in millions in council tax.
Viva la revolution!!
[quote][p][bold]roskoboskovic[/bold] wrote: this just confirms the sorry state of affairs in york where greedy landlords basically dictate the life choice of our young people.market forces mean that they get sky high rents from a never ending procession of students who can afford the costs through low rate loans/student loans and mum and dad.the council want to build more houses a large proportion of which will be snapped up by the speculators thus perpetuating the vicious circle.on a low or minimum wage not only can our kids have no hope of a mortgage they can no longer afford to rent whilst ycc rake in millions in council tax.[/p][/quote]Viva la revolution!! Mr. Marcus
  • Score: -5

3:36pm Wed 12 Feb 14

York Fox says...

A few points...

Landlords SHOULD pay local/council taxes on all rental properties. It should not be passed on to the tenants. This happens elsewhere in the world (W. Australia for example). I also believe that tax of landlord incomes should be looked at in general.

Students don't pay 'high rents' because of the state/mummy and daddy, they pay high rents because a) they have to and b) landlords pack them in, using up and even subdividing dining rooms and living rooms as bedrooms. They only get a fraction of a house i.e. a single room for their rents. It is probably that student HMOs actually reduce housing pressure as density is increased in a way that would be unacceptable to anyone but a student.

Building houses is part of the solution, but more important in York right now is providing decent jobs.

Unfortunately, York is going to suffer as people will accept lower wages and pay higher prices to live somewhere attractive. It is a nice place to live and especially retirees who are cash rich will always see York as a hotspot.

Finally, and most importantly any action taken must be done gently and proportionally, as anything kneejerk or rapid could cause the collapse of the housing market, aand whilst this might be a good thing for some in the long term, in the short term it would put hundreds of thousands of families into negative equity, repossessions and homelessness.

Another essential is reducing immigration to a level where housing pressure is not increased from abroad.
A few points... Landlords SHOULD pay local/council taxes on all rental properties. It should not be passed on to the tenants. This happens elsewhere in the world (W. Australia for example). I also believe that tax of landlord incomes should be looked at in general. Students don't pay 'high rents' because of the state/mummy and daddy, they pay high rents because a) they have to and b) landlords pack them in, using up and even subdividing dining rooms and living rooms as bedrooms. They only get a fraction of a house i.e. a single room for their rents. It is probably that student HMOs actually reduce housing pressure as density is increased in a way that would be unacceptable to anyone but a student. Building houses is part of the solution, but more important in York right now is providing decent jobs. Unfortunately, York is going to suffer as people will accept lower wages and pay higher prices to live somewhere attractive. It is a nice place to live and especially retirees who are cash rich will always see York as a hotspot. Finally, and most importantly any action taken must be done gently and proportionally, as anything kneejerk or rapid could cause the collapse of the housing market, aand whilst this might be a good thing for some in the long term, in the short term it would put hundreds of thousands of families into negative equity, repossessions and homelessness. Another essential is reducing immigration to a level where housing pressure is not increased from abroad. York Fox
  • Score: 5

4:02pm Wed 12 Feb 14

sounds weird but says...

straylandsbloke says...

"Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think."

Then businesses will mitigate thier other taxes with suppliments from the govt for employing various groups of people, as well as avoiding taxes so we're still not getting all of the tax back.

Oaklands Resident wrote:

"A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000."

nasrudin says...
"But yes, for something over £110,000 you can buy 80% of a flat."

That flat has been on and off the market for 3 years or so. I looked at it a while ago and the £100k+ price tag seemed too high for me as the quality of the flat seemed low - ie not worth the money!

Finally I agree on landlords paying the council tax, but coupled with the rent cap CaroleBaines mentioned earlier. Then the rents couldnt be increased to include the council tax.
straylandsbloke says... "Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think." Then businesses will mitigate thier other taxes with suppliments from the govt for employing various groups of people, as well as avoiding taxes so we're still not getting all of the tax back. Oaklands Resident wrote: "A modern 2 bed flat has just gone on sale in the City Centre (George Street) advertised at £100,000." nasrudin says... "But yes, for something over £110,000 you can buy 80% of a flat." That flat has been on and off the market for 3 years or so. I looked at it a while ago and the £100k+ price tag seemed too high for me as the quality of the flat seemed low - ie not worth the money! Finally I agree on landlords paying the council tax, but coupled with the rent cap CaroleBaines mentioned earlier. Then the rents couldnt be increased to include the council tax. sounds weird but
  • Score: 5

5:06pm Wed 12 Feb 14

chelk says...

Said it previously it should be compulsory for all Universities to build their own accommodation for their students that would free up housing and as such there would be so much available housing landlords would have to reduce their rent to compete if not there should be a legal maximum rent that can be charged
Said it previously it should be compulsory for all Universities to build their own accommodation for their students that would free up housing and as such there would be so much available housing landlords would have to reduce their rent to compete if not there should be a legal maximum rent that can be charged chelk
  • Score: -1

5:27pm Wed 12 Feb 14

pbrowne2009@live.co.uk says...

So much I want to get of my chest on this article it rattles me..... Greedy landlords in York are getting worse each month. 9 years ago I started renting when I moved out of my parents home, you had the odd student homes here and there. Now, all you need to do is drive through tang hall, Osbaldwick, Hull Road, The Groves, Haxby Road, Heslington, Fulford and Bishopthorpe road and Its like York is actually turning into the next Cambridge where the city is build AROUND the university and collages. I drove down Siward street just off Hull road last week and no word of a lie, 75% of the terrace homes down there were up for let for students. I moved into a small cul-de-sac off temple ave in Tang Hall 3 years ago and we had the odd student house here and there, now Temple Ave is plastered with them. The house opposite me is occupied by a lady who's landlord tried to evict her, to turn it into a student home. Luckily it got turned down. The house on the next cul-de-sac is a 5 bed home (just converted of course) renting at £70pw pp. That's £1516 PER MONTH when the average 3 bed on the street goes for about £600-£700pm.

Also, I stopped reading the article (skipped to the comments section) after I read that the AVERAGE wage in SELBY is £24,482 yet in York it's only £23,436. Yet when you look at the average house price in Selby its nearly 2/3 cheaper than a home in York. 1st of all, if the AVERAGE wage in York/Selby is around the £24,000 mark, I need to rethink my life. I dream of the day I was earning around that amount per year. And how does the average person in Selby earn an average £24,482 when 80% of the work going there is retail and office work? The population of Acomb is probably more than Selby. I'd like that as an IT Technician I'm doing more than the 'Average' job, yet I don't even see £20k let alone £23k
So much I want to get of my chest on this article it rattles me..... Greedy landlords in York are getting worse each month. 9 years ago I started renting when I moved out of my parents home, you had the odd student homes here and there. Now, all you need to do is drive through tang hall, Osbaldwick, Hull Road, The Groves, Haxby Road, Heslington, Fulford and Bishopthorpe road and Its like York is actually turning into the next Cambridge where the city is build AROUND the university and collages. I drove down Siward street just off Hull road last week and no word of a lie, 75% of the terrace homes down there were up for let for students. I moved into a small cul-de-sac off temple ave in Tang Hall 3 years ago and we had the odd student house here and there, now Temple Ave is plastered with them. The house opposite me is occupied by a lady who's landlord tried to evict her, to turn it into a student home. Luckily it got turned down. The house on the next cul-de-sac is a 5 bed home (just converted of course) renting at £70pw pp. That's £1516 PER MONTH when the average 3 bed on the street goes for about £600-£700pm. Also, I stopped reading the article (skipped to the comments section) after I read that the AVERAGE wage in SELBY is £24,482 yet in York it's only £23,436. Yet when you look at the average house price in Selby its nearly 2/3 cheaper than a home in York. 1st of all, if the AVERAGE wage in York/Selby is around the £24,000 mark, I need to rethink my life. I dream of the day I was earning around that amount per year. And how does the average person in Selby earn an average £24,482 when 80% of the work going there is retail and office work? The population of Acomb is probably more than Selby. I'd like that as an IT Technician I'm doing more than the 'Average' job, yet I don't even see £20k let alone £23k pbrowne2009@live.co.uk
  • Score: 9

5:37pm Wed 12 Feb 14

straylandsbloke says...

sounds weird but says

straylandsbloke says...

"Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think."

Then businesses will mitigate thier other taxes with suppliments from the govt for employing various groups of people, as well as avoiding taxes so we're still not getting all of the tax back.

Pretty sure plenty never "get the tax back" always winners and losers depending on what public services you use, that is the nature of tax in this country. You have a say on what that is spent on when you vote, a pretty crappy system admittedly but the one we are stuck with.
sounds weird but says straylandsbloke says... "Students add to the local economy spend money in local busineses, who in turn pay business rates, it is not as black and white as you think." Then businesses will mitigate thier other taxes with suppliments from the govt for employing various groups of people, as well as avoiding taxes so we're still not getting all of the tax back. Pretty sure plenty never "get the tax back" always winners and losers depending on what public services you use, that is the nature of tax in this country. You have a say on what that is spent on when you vote, a pretty crappy system admittedly but the one we are stuck with. straylandsbloke
  • Score: -2

6:27pm Wed 12 Feb 14

CaroleBaines says...

What gets my goat about landlords is how petty they can be. I home own but the stories I hear from friends and relations re landlord penny pinching. Landlord owners of a £800 a month flat my friend lives in won't even replace a 1990s TV set (item on the inventory in furnished flat) whose technology is so old it won't connect to modern world. Mind you - those landlords might become famous soon - watch the Press over next few weeks!
What gets my goat about landlords is how petty they can be. I home own but the stories I hear from friends and relations re landlord penny pinching. Landlord owners of a £800 a month flat my friend lives in won't even replace a 1990s TV set (item on the inventory in furnished flat) whose technology is so old it won't connect to modern world. Mind you - those landlords might become famous soon - watch the Press over next few weeks! CaroleBaines
  • Score: 6

2:53am Thu 13 Feb 14

Magicman! says...

I am seeing a connection between the most expensive housing areas... all of them have decent transport links to London, all the most expensive areas mentioned have at least 1 direct southbound and 1 direct northbound train to the capital per day... whilst Scarborough does not, and Hambleton/Ryedale have poorer transport provision in general.

As for private landlords. If this council is seriosu they would implement a policy heavily restricting how many houses can be privately rented - something like 10-20% of the total houses in a street... so in Osbaldwick Tranby Avenue, which has about 100 houses, only 15 would be allowed to be privately rented; whilst a smaller street containing less than 50 houses would be allowed 20% privately rented, and a street of 200 or more houses be allowed just 10% as privately rented... the %-age of private rent properties decreasing proportionally to the increase in houses on a street. Then of those private rented houses allowed, add in another restriction whereby no more than 30% of those can be Houses of Multiple Occupancy. This would free up large swathes of housing stock, particularly around Badger Hill/Osbaldwick/Hull Road/The Groves for families who really need houses - perhaps the council could buy those and increase the number of council houses available.
Students would need somewhere to reside during their studies - and thankfully York has many office developments lying completely empty in the city centre. Roman House, Stonebow House, Ryedale House, Hudson House - all either wholly or mostly empty... these could be developed into student digs: right in the city centre where the action, nightclubs and live music venues are, and also very close to bus stops for buses to the universities (York St John could perhaps part-fund an electric minibus to provide a free bus service around the city centre - taking in Gillygate, Rougier Street, Tower Street, Piccadilly, Stonebow, St Maurices Road, Monkgate, Penleys Grove Street, Clarence Street...). Currently Roman House is being developed into 'luxury apartments' - a move I pesonally think is fundamentally flawed as nobody will want to pay high prices to walk into a pile of sick each morning when they step onto the street, listen to emergency vehicle sirens during the night along with loud music from nearby clubs, and have nowhere to park their car... whilst students don't have any of those issues! House students into purpose built or refurbished dwellings, and free up the housing stock for those who actually need it.
I am seeing a connection between the most expensive housing areas... all of them have decent transport links to London, all the most expensive areas mentioned have at least 1 direct southbound and 1 direct northbound train to the capital per day... whilst Scarborough does not, and Hambleton/Ryedale have poorer transport provision in general. As for private landlords. If this council is seriosu they would implement a policy heavily restricting how many houses can be privately rented - something like 10-20% of the total houses in a street... so in Osbaldwick Tranby Avenue, which has about 100 houses, only 15 would be allowed to be privately rented; whilst a smaller street containing less than 50 houses would be allowed 20% privately rented, and a street of 200 or more houses be allowed just 10% as privately rented... the %-age of private rent properties decreasing proportionally to the increase in houses on a street. Then of those private rented houses allowed, add in another restriction whereby no more than 30% of those can be Houses of Multiple Occupancy. This would free up large swathes of housing stock, particularly around Badger Hill/Osbaldwick/Hull Road/The Groves for families who really need houses - perhaps the council could buy those and increase the number of council houses available. Students would need somewhere to reside during their studies - and thankfully York has many office developments lying completely empty in the city centre. Roman House, Stonebow House, Ryedale House, Hudson House - all either wholly or mostly empty... these could be developed into student digs: right in the city centre where the action, nightclubs and live music venues are, and also very close to bus stops for buses to the universities (York St John could perhaps part-fund an electric minibus to provide a free bus service around the city centre - taking in Gillygate, Rougier Street, Tower Street, Piccadilly, Stonebow, St Maurices Road, Monkgate, Penleys Grove Street, Clarence Street...). Currently Roman House is being developed into 'luxury apartments' - a move I pesonally think is fundamentally flawed as nobody will want to pay high prices to walk into a pile of sick each morning when they step onto the street, listen to emergency vehicle sirens during the night along with loud music from nearby clubs, and have nowhere to park their car... whilst students don't have any of those issues! House students into purpose built or refurbished dwellings, and free up the housing stock for those who actually need it. Magicman!
  • Score: 3

10:19am Thu 13 Feb 14

tonyfromitaly says...

CaroleBaines wrote:
What gets my goat about landlords is how petty they can be. I home own but the stories I hear from friends and relations re landlord penny pinching. Landlord owners of a £800 a month flat my friend lives in won't even replace a 1990s TV set (item on the inventory in furnished flat) whose technology is so old it won't connect to modern world. Mind you - those landlords might become famous soon - watch the Press over next few weeks!
Go on give us a clue ? Famous for what ?
[quote][p][bold]CaroleBaines[/bold] wrote: What gets my goat about landlords is how petty they can be. I home own but the stories I hear from friends and relations re landlord penny pinching. Landlord owners of a £800 a month flat my friend lives in won't even replace a 1990s TV set (item on the inventory in furnished flat) whose technology is so old it won't connect to modern world. Mind you - those landlords might become famous soon - watch the Press over next few weeks![/p][/quote]Go on give us a clue ? Famous for what ? tonyfromitaly
  • Score: -7

12:22pm Thu 13 Feb 14

SuperChris says...

I shall inform my manager
I shall inform my manager SuperChris
  • Score: -5

1:59pm Fri 14 Feb 14

meme says...

this survey is completely misleading and skewed for political purposes
The AVERAGE house price includes everything from the cheapest to the most expensive. There are houses from £100K to £4 million
Much as I would like to buy a £3 million house unless my wage went up dramatically I could not do so
This is not to do with greedy landlords despite what some say or want to promote; its to do with desirability and demand and supply. CoYC have managed to restrict supply due to their planning policies in a desirable area so prices go up FACT. To be fair the locals don't help as there are always objections to any planning applications again restricting supply.
Lets face it we live in a great City; Supply will always be constrained; demand will always be high so prices will always be higher than say Selby etc Its a fact of life!
this survey is completely misleading and skewed for political purposes The AVERAGE house price includes everything from the cheapest to the most expensive. There are houses from £100K to £4 million Much as I would like to buy a £3 million house unless my wage went up dramatically I could not do so This is not to do with greedy landlords despite what some say or want to promote; its to do with desirability and demand and supply. CoYC have managed to restrict supply due to their planning policies in a desirable area so prices go up FACT. To be fair the locals don't help as there are always objections to any planning applications again restricting supply. Lets face it we live in a great City; Supply will always be constrained; demand will always be high so prices will always be higher than say Selby etc Its a fact of life! meme
  • Score: 4

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