Christmas toys bonanza on children’s ward at York Hospital

York Press: At the handover of toys to the children’s ward at York Hospital are, from left, nursery nurse Gill Adams, staff nurse Claire Kilmartin with Leo Mortimer (18 months), Kim Stirk, Aviva catering manager, Aviva chef Matty Robson, and front, Nia McVay (14 mo At the handover of toys to the children’s ward at York Hospital are, from left, nursery nurse Gill Adams, staff nurse Claire Kilmartin with Leo Mortimer (18 months), Kim Stirk, Aviva catering manager, Aviva chef Matty Robson, and front, Nia McVay (14 mo

CHRISTMAS was brightened for youngsters who had to spend the festive season in hospital thanks to a York insurance company.

Aviva donated a batch of toys to the children’s ward at York Hospital, with some of its staff paying a pre-Christmas visit to the Wigginton Road site to hand over the gifts to the ward team.

“We are grateful for this kind donation and the children who were on the ward over Christmas really appreciated having these gifts to open on Christmas Day,” said Gill Adams from the play team.

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10:21am Wed 1 Jan 14

Daisy75 says...

I don't want to be churlish, but surely the money spent on this could be better spent elsewhere? Whilst it's miserable for kids to be in hospital over Xmas, there's no reason to believe the kids are lacking in Christmas presents. The stuff they are given in events like this aren't necessarily what they want, unlike the gifts from friends and family. Why not use the money to donate to small poorly funded charities instead? There are plenty of charities out there dealing with rare and/or less appealing conditions that need this more.
I don't want to be churlish, but surely the money spent on this could be better spent elsewhere? Whilst it's miserable for kids to be in hospital over Xmas, there's no reason to believe the kids are lacking in Christmas presents. The stuff they are given in events like this aren't necessarily what they want, unlike the gifts from friends and family. Why not use the money to donate to small poorly funded charities instead? There are plenty of charities out there dealing with rare and/or less appealing conditions that need this more. Daisy75

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