York near bottom of bed-blocking league

York Press: York Hospital York Hospital

YORK is languishing at the bottom of national league tables for “bed blocking”, new figures have revealed.

As reported in the The Press, 1,088 hospital “bed days” are lost in York each month because not enough places are available for patients ready to leave hospital.

Now national figures show the city ranks 147th out of 151 across the whole of England for these delays in the transfer of care, performing well below the national average.

Neighbouring authorities perform much better in the figures published by the Health and Social Care Information Service. North Yorkshire ranks at 94 out of 151, Leeds at 84, and the East Riding of Yorkshire at 51 out of 151.

When the figures are restricted to the delays attributable to local social services, rather than the NHS, York ranks 140th out of 142 local authorities and performs four times worse than the average for Yorkshire and the Humber.

Liberal Democrat councillor Nigel Ayre said: “These figures show the true scale of the problem and reveal just how poorly York is performing compared to the regional and national averages.

“The figures also reveal that the biggest issue lies with social care services overseen by the council rather than delays with the NHS.”

He called on council leaders to avoid playing politics with the issue, but come up with answers on why York performs so badly and causes so many delays for patients leaving hospital.

City of York Council has said it is “seeking clarification” over the earlier figures which were published by NHS England, saying they were at odds with another set of data sent out by the Audit Commission.

Council leader James Alexander said demand for social care was increasing, but the council had committed resources to help meet demand and to cope with the growing complexity of care needs.

A spokesman for York Hospital said bosses wanted to see fewer patients delayed in its beds, but had to make sure people were fit to leave hospital and could be discharged safely to the right place with the right support.

Comments (8)

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2:30pm Thu 26 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

You wonder why all those ambulances were queued up in front of A&E cos the hospital are bed blocked!

Or is the bed blocking simply because the patients refuse to be transferred to care homes because they or their relatives have to pay the hefty bill in lieu of care home fees?

One place I would have to say is spending weeks in hospital wherever it is to get the next bug going around
You wonder why all those ambulances were queued up in front of A&E cos the hospital are bed blocked! Or is the bed blocking simply because the patients refuse to be transferred to care homes because they or their relatives have to pay the hefty bill in lieu of care home fees? One place I would have to say is spending weeks in hospital wherever it is to get the next bug going around Digeorge

9:26pm Thu 26 Dec 13

Wiggles says...

Digeorge wrote:
You wonder why all those ambulances were queued up in front of A&E cos the hospital are bed blocked!

Or is the bed blocking simply because the patients refuse to be transferred to care homes because they or their relatives have to pay the hefty bill in lieu of care home fees?

One place I would have to say is spending weeks in hospital wherever it is to get the next bug going around
you really don't have a clue do you? We have an elderly relative that is currently in YDH - a week ago she was deemed in an assessment to need round the clock, non-medical supervision - the wheels were set in motion to move her to respite care whilst a suitable placement was found for her. Following a mental and OH assessment she was deemed to be fit to be sent home with a care package. The care package is something that we have tried on 4 previous occasions all of which have resulted in failure to issue vital medication on time and a subsequent long stay in hospital - we are quite prepared to hand over attendance allowance etc but when the care being provided is next to non-existent and we are having to pick up the slack, despite having to juggle full time employment why should we? City of York council should hang their heads in shame - care being outsourced to the totally incompetent Ricall Carers when CoY are spending £500K on a few flagstones to 'enhance' King's Square but then again as we all know tourists are more important than tax paying locals.....
[quote][p][bold]Digeorge[/bold] wrote: You wonder why all those ambulances were queued up in front of A&E cos the hospital are bed blocked! Or is the bed blocking simply because the patients refuse to be transferred to care homes because they or their relatives have to pay the hefty bill in lieu of care home fees? One place I would have to say is spending weeks in hospital wherever it is to get the next bug going around[/p][/quote]you really don't have a clue do you? We have an elderly relative that is currently in YDH - a week ago she was deemed in an assessment to need round the clock, non-medical supervision - the wheels were set in motion to move her to respite care whilst a suitable placement was found for her. Following a mental and OH assessment she was deemed to be fit to be sent home with a care package. The care package is something that we have tried on 4 previous occasions all of which have resulted in failure to issue vital medication on time and a subsequent long stay in hospital - we are quite prepared to hand over attendance allowance etc but when the care being provided is next to non-existent and we are having to pick up the slack, despite having to juggle full time employment why should we? City of York council should hang their heads in shame - care being outsourced to the totally incompetent Ricall Carers when CoY are spending £500K on a few flagstones to 'enhance' King's Square but then again as we all know tourists are more important than tax paying locals..... Wiggles

3:02am Fri 27 Dec 13

Magicman! says...

Private care companies for the elderly and infirm are simply ripping everybody off... we had a quote once for a reliative who'd had a stroke and was paralysed down one side and doubly incontinent - the quote was roughly £1000 a WEEK, which would have meant the entire inheritance was gone in just over a year - everything that guy had worked his entire life for (50+ years), working long shifts of heavy manual work, finding out his bosses had stolen the pension fund, all gone into the back pocket of some random faceless care company paying their frontline staff minimum wage on zero-hours contracts.... but this didn't happen in the end as he caught a bug in the hospital for the second time and died.
Private care companies for the elderly and infirm are simply ripping everybody off... we had a quote once for a reliative who'd had a stroke and was paralysed down one side and doubly incontinent - the quote was roughly £1000 a WEEK, which would have meant the entire inheritance was gone in just over a year - everything that guy had worked his entire life for (50+ years), working long shifts of heavy manual work, finding out his bosses had stolen the pension fund, all gone into the back pocket of some random faceless care company paying their frontline staff minimum wage on zero-hours contracts.... but this didn't happen in the end as he caught a bug in the hospital for the second time and died. Magicman!

8:54am Fri 27 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

Actually I do! ! I had an disabled elderly relative who we had to pay for care, and yes, lost all her savings on care home fees at £360 per week. I ended up caring for her full-time and a very disabled child - 24 hours a day, 365 days a year otherwise both would have been in hospital for a very long time. I earn £32.25 per week as a full-time carer for years and had her living in my house. So please don't tell me about social workers as I managed to get two in my house at one time - an adult one and a child one.and a d full know the cost and how much of her savings went into residential care some £1200 per month and that was a few years ago.

I expect to pay for my care from my house and also I expect my mother to pay for her care from her savings and she full knows it.
Actually I do! ! I had an disabled elderly relative who we had to pay for care, and yes, lost all her savings on care home fees at £360 per week. I ended up caring for her full-time and a very disabled child - 24 hours a day, 365 days a year otherwise both would have been in hospital for a very long time. I earn £32.25 per week as a full-time carer for years and had her living in my house. So please don't tell me about social workers as I managed to get two in my house at one time - an adult one and a child one.and a d full know the cost and how much of her savings went into residential care some £1200 per month and that was a few years ago. I expect to pay for my care from my house and also I expect my mother to pay for her care from her savings and she full knows it. Digeorge

8:59am Fri 27 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

The actual care home in question was at the corner of the Mount in Malton and would recommend it. Does nursing care as well and was well looked after before she came to live with us.
The actual care home in question was at the corner of the Mount in Malton and would recommend it. Does nursing care as well and was well looked after before she came to live with us. Digeorge

9:34am Fri 27 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

I also put a link on here for the means test of deprivation of assets in care homes. The Council are fully entitled to claim back assets which have been deliberately 'given away' to deprive the individual of income and assets.

Furthermore most of these people will have DLA Higher Rate and pension state that is taken into account as income to pay for fees. I appreciate that it is a tough rule. My relative paid for hers out of sale of her flat, she wasn't wealthy at all but alongside her in the home were people who were on benefits hadn't saved a thing and got the same care as her. So life is a little unfair at times and yes, caring is hard work and didn't have and couldn't work full-time or even part-time and had carers in too when she lived with us.

http://www.ageuk.org
.uk/home-and-care/ca
re-homes/deprivation
-of-assets-in-the-me
ans-test-for-care-ho
me-provision/

In fact, caring is the hardest job that I have ever done including legal advice to clients in similar positions to these.
I also put a link on here for the means test of deprivation of assets in care homes. The Council are fully entitled to claim back assets which have been deliberately 'given away' to deprive the individual of income and assets. Furthermore most of these people will have DLA Higher Rate and pension state that is taken into account as income to pay for fees. I appreciate that it is a tough rule. My relative paid for hers out of sale of her flat, she wasn't wealthy at all but alongside her in the home were people who were on benefits hadn't saved a thing and got the same care as her. So life is a little unfair at times and yes, caring is hard work and didn't have and couldn't work full-time or even part-time and had carers in too when she lived with us. http://www.ageuk.org .uk/home-and-care/ca re-homes/deprivation -of-assets-in-the-me ans-test-for-care-ho me-provision/ In fact, caring is the hardest job that I have ever done including legal advice to clients in similar positions to these. Digeorge

12:07am Sat 28 Dec 13

Wiggles says...

Digeorge wrote:
Actually I do! ! I had an disabled elderly relative who we had to pay for care, and yes, lost all her savings on care home fees at £360 per week. I ended up caring for her full-time and a very disabled child - 24 hours a day, 365 days a year otherwise both would have been in hospital for a very long time. I earn £32.25 per week as a full-time carer for years and had her living in my house. So please don't tell me about social workers as I managed to get two in my house at one time - an adult one and a child one.and a d full know the cost and how much of her savings went into residential care some £1200 per month and that was a few years ago.

I expect to pay for my care from my house and also I expect my mother to pay for her care from her savings and she full knows it.
Digeorge - I'm not sure I follow your post but respect that you can provide 24/7 care to your relative and your child - however as I already mentioned my husband works full time and I work part-time whilst looking after my own family - how do we factor in caring for a 90 year old grandparent and a 72 year old mother with alzheimers. Both individuals require care and are living in council properties so have no home to sell - neither my husband or myself can provide the care they need and certainly cannot subsidise the care costs so what happens to those in need - as I have already said care packages are woeful - COY council would rather spend money on ridiculous projects that entice tourists into the city than spending on elderly and other vunerable residents - the fact of the matter is that is would be cheaper to get reasonable care for the elderly in their own homes than to find them residential care placements.
[quote][p][bold]Digeorge[/bold] wrote: Actually I do! ! I had an disabled elderly relative who we had to pay for care, and yes, lost all her savings on care home fees at £360 per week. I ended up caring for her full-time and a very disabled child - 24 hours a day, 365 days a year otherwise both would have been in hospital for a very long time. I earn £32.25 per week as a full-time carer for years and had her living in my house. So please don't tell me about social workers as I managed to get two in my house at one time - an adult one and a child one.and a d full know the cost and how much of her savings went into residential care some £1200 per month and that was a few years ago. I expect to pay for my care from my house and also I expect my mother to pay for her care from her savings and she full knows it.[/p][/quote]Digeorge - I'm not sure I follow your post but respect that you can provide 24/7 care to your relative and your child - however as I already mentioned my husband works full time and I work part-time whilst looking after my own family - how do we factor in caring for a 90 year old grandparent and a 72 year old mother with alzheimers. Both individuals require care and are living in council properties so have no home to sell - neither my husband or myself can provide the care they need and certainly cannot subsidise the care costs so what happens to those in need - as I have already said care packages are woeful - COY council would rather spend money on ridiculous projects that entice tourists into the city than spending on elderly and other vunerable residents - the fact of the matter is that is would be cheaper to get reasonable care for the elderly in their own homes than to find them residential care placements. Wiggles

12:18pm Sat 28 Dec 13

Digeorge says...

Wiggles - I appreciate what you are saying = with a great deal of difficulty. If I had said that I had a baby in PICU on a life support machine (who later was very disabled) and an disabled adult who had three strokes, one heart attack in the opposite ends of the country at the same time who was discharged without an assessment and couldn't even get down stairs pretty much sums it up. I spent 10 years of my life looking after my disabled mother-in-law in our house and didn't work because of it! Not easy at all.

We had a garage half a garage full of disability aids when she died and a chair lift that was worthless spent £2,000 on it. Wasn't by choice but after spending £100,000 on care that came to it, I couldn't work nor could she live in her own home. So much for the inheritance (there wasn't much left).

But turning to your point on CoY council, they are better than North Yorkshire County Council by a long way, it is also this time of year that the process is so slow for assessments.
Wiggles - I appreciate what you are saying = with a great deal of difficulty. If I had said that I had a baby in PICU on a life support machine (who later was very disabled) and an disabled adult who had three strokes, one heart attack in the opposite ends of the country at the same time who was discharged without an assessment and couldn't even get down stairs pretty much sums it up. I spent 10 years of my life looking after my disabled mother-in-law in our house and didn't work because of it! Not easy at all. We had a garage half a garage full of disability aids when she died and a chair lift that was worthless spent £2,000 on it. Wasn't by choice but after spending £100,000 on care that came to it, I couldn't work nor could she live in her own home. So much for the inheritance (there wasn't much left). But turning to your point on CoY council, they are better than North Yorkshire County Council by a long way, it is also this time of year that the process is so slow for assessments. Digeorge

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